Discover more about this incredibly popular wine grape variety and the best dishes to enhance the flavours of this dry white wine.

Advertisement

Then, check out our BBC Good Food Wine Club. In partnership with Laithwaite’s, we’re offering discounts on exclusively curated cases of wine, chosen by wine experts and the BBC Good Food team, for you to subscribe to or buy as a gift.

Order now

What is Pinot Grigio wine?

Pinot grigio being poured into glass

Pinot Grigio is one of the most popular grapes in Britain. In fact, there are few pubs that would omit it from the wine list. Most are simple dry wines from northern Italy, ideal for drinking cold on sunny days. But, in Alsace, where it’s known as Pinot Gris, it makes perfumed wine dripping with honey and spice.

Pinot Gris was first discovered in Burgundy, though it’s rarely seen in its home territory. You’re more likely to find it in Alsace, where it produces a range of wines. It’s a mutation of Pinot Noir and means ‘grey pinot’, but wines made from the grape have a faint pink tinge. Despite its French origins, it’s best known by its Italian name, Pinot Grigio. It’s planted all over northern Italy, especially around Venice and in the foothills of the Alps. It’s also grown in Germany, Austria, Hungary, Romania, England, the US, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. Pinot Grigio can be used in sparkling wine and is allowed (but rarely seen) in champagne. Growers take advantage of the pink skin to make pale rosés or orange wines, too.

What does Pinot Grigio wine taste like?

Pinot Grigio is usually crisp, with citrus fruit, apples and a hint of spice. Richer bottles, especially those from Alsace, can have notes of peaches, candied ginger, honey and rose petal. Most Pinot Grigio is dry, but it’s also made in off-dry and even sweet styles, particularly in Alsace. Generally, it’s seen on its own, but it sometimes appears in blends, too.

What dishes go well with Pinot Grigio wine?

Seafood and corn in pan

Italian Pinot Grigio is great with seafood recipes. It also pairs well with fresh veg dishes, like green pea risotto. In off-dry form, it’s great with lighter Indian dishes and Thai recipes made with coconut. Richer wines go well with creamy cheeses, such as fondue. Sweet bottles would be perfect with a mixed fruit tart, pears in syrup or simply a ripe Italian peach served alongside mozzarella.

Sign up to the BBC Good Food Wine Club

For more expertly-selected bottles, become a member of the BBC Good Food Wine Club. It's simple really – wines from quality-focused, family-run wineries around the world. They've been hand-selected by our dedicated team of experts, so you can be sure that what you're getting will be unique, interesting and – above all – delicious.

Order now

Advertisement

Enjoyed learning more about wine? Check out even more pairing guides...

How to taste wine
The best wines to drink with chicken
How to choose wine
How to pair wine with food

Comments, questions and tips

Choose the type of message you'd like to post

Choose the type of message you'd like to post
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement