Ultimate chilli con carne

Ultimate chilli con carne

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(8 ratings)

Prep: 1 hr, 15 mins Cook: 2 hrs plus overnight chilling

Easy

Serves 6
For a more authentic chilli with a depth of flavour, use diced belly pork, beef steak and pancetta and slowly simmer

Nutrition and extra info

  • Freezable

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal555
  • fat29g
  • saturates9g
  • carbs12g
  • sugars4g
  • fibre4g
  • protein51g
  • salt1.9g
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Ingredients

  • 500g lean belly pork slices
    Pork

    Pork

    paw-k

    One of the most versatile types of meat, pork is economical, tender if cooked correctly, and…

  • 700g skirt steak or lean stewing beef
    Steak

    Steak

    Stayk

    Steak is essentially a boneless thick or thin slice of red meat, cut across the grain of a large…

  • 75g diced pancetta or rashers rindless smoked streaky bacon
    Pancetta

    Pancetta

    pan-chet-ah

    Pancetta is Italian cured pork belly - the equivalent of streaky bacon. It has a deep, strong,…

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
    olive oil

    Olive oil

    ol-iv oyl

    Probably the most widely-used oil in cooking, olive oil is pressed from fresh olives. It's…

  • 2 onions, chopped
    Onion

    Onion

    un-yun

    Onions are endlessly versatile and an essential ingredient in countless recipes. Native to Asia…

  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 unwaxed lemon
    Lemon

    Lemon

    le-mon

    Oval in shape, with a pronouced bulge on one end, lemons are one of the most versatile fruits…

  • 3 tbsp Mexican chilli powder (see tip) or the milder dulce pimentón powder
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp flour
    Flour

    Flour

    fl-ow-er

    Flour is a powdery ingredient usually made from grinding wheat, maize, rye, barley or rice. As…

  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
    Oregano

    Oregano

    or-ee-gar-no

    Closely related to marjoram, of which it is the wild equivalent, oregano has a coarser, more…

  • 2 tbsp tomato purée
  • 300ml red wine
  • 450ml chicken or beef stock
  • 400g can black beans, drained and rinsed

To serve

  • rice or couscous, to serve
    Couscous

    Couscous

    koos-koos

    Consisting of many tiny granules made from steamed and dried durum wheat, couscous has become a…

  • 300ml soured cream
  • 4 small firm ripe avocados
    Avocado

    Avocado

    av-oh-car-doh

    Although it's technically a fruit, the mild-flavoured avocado is used as a vegetable. Native…

  • juice 2 limes, plus extra wedges to serve (optional)
    Lime

    Lime

    ly-m

    The same shape, but smaller than…

  • 2 tbsp sweet chilli dipping sauce
  • 2 tbsp chopped coriander or chives

Method

  1. The day before, cut all the meat into small chunks – this will take at least 30 mins. In a spacious, heavy-based pan, fry the pancetta in the oil over a medium heat until it is crisp and the fat has melted.

  2. Stir the onions and garlic into the crisping pancetta and cook, stirring often, for 10-15 mins until soft.

  3. Cut the lemon into quarters lengthways, then remove the pithy core and seeds. Chop into small pieces (each with a bit of peel). Remove the pan from the heat and scoop the contents into a sieve, letting any fat drain back into the pan – and give some encouragement with a wooden spoon.

  4. Return the pan to the heat and brown the pork in the hot fat, then stir in the beef and brown that too. Add the chilli powder and cumin, and cook over a low heat for 2 mins, stirring constantly. Add the flour and cook for a further 2 mins. Add the bay leaves, 1/2 tsp salt, the lemon, oregano, tomato purée, red wine and stock. Return the onions to the pan. Bring to a simmer, stirring often, then reduce the heat and cook, uncovered, and stirring occasionally to avoid sticking, for 2 hrs until the sauce is thick and the liquid has reduced. Add salt to taste. Cool, cover and chill overnight. Can be frozen at this stage for up to 1 month – defrost overnight in the fridge before continuing with the recipe.

  5. Add the beans to the chilli and reheat. Serve with rice or couscous, a dollop of soured cream, slices of avocado tossed in lime juice, a splash of chilli sauce, sprinkling of coriander, and lime wedges, if you like.

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Comments, questions and tips

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lizleicester
16th Aug, 2015
5.05
This is a really tasty recipe. It took quite a lot of preparation but I then put it in the slow cooker for ages (approx 6 hours) and it was meltingly delicious. Quite lemony so if your not sure about that flavour, just add half a chopped lemon.
siannewbury
10th May, 2015
5.05
I made this recipe and it was amazing! I used mince instead of cutting it all up, and I put the lemons in and it was just amazing!
Siani68
5th May, 2015
Made this without the lemons, & used pork & beef mince - hubby said it was the best, chilli he had ever had. Making mince today for cottage pie & using the ingredients as above, without the chilli spices, lemons & beans - hoping for just as successful a recipe. Fantastic x
sonyahand
28th Mar, 2015
Tried this last night and after reading comments I left out the lemons - I went down really well with my guests who asked for the recipe. It was rich and flavoursome. Thing I would say is that next time I'll remove the fat off the belly pork, it didn't render down and I had to fish out the little pieces and cut off the fat as no one wants to eat that! I might try mincing the pork too next time to cut down the prep time - I didn't feel the effort of dicing improved the recipe that much
middia
25th Mar, 2015
5.05
I have to disagree- I cooked this for friends and we all absolutely loved it, including the added lemon. I cooked it for the full two hours, and the lemon almost disintegrated. I think it was the mix of pork belly and beef skirt which made it so delicious.
thepoppythompso...
7th Mar, 2015
1.3
Would HIGHLY recommend not using lemon. It was far too bitter and the lemon left a horrible after taste. It might be ok with lemon juice in it but wouldn't simmer the meat with the lemon chunks.
HamboGlider
22nd Oct, 2016
You need a lemon with a thin white pith, and discard any peel that has a thick pith.
cheryl@jonestow...
25th Feb, 2015
1.3
I was not keen either and found it sour. Prefer chilli with mince instead of chunks but that's my personal opinion. Lot of bother for the result and won't make again.
nzrxu
14th Feb, 2015
2.55
I tried it today and it's in my opinion much too sour. Better use only a little of a lemon.
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HamboGlider
22nd Oct, 2016
I have made this twice now. First time it was perfect, second time it was OK, but a bit too bitter for my taste. I think the difference was the kind of lemon used - the 2nd time the lemon had a thick white pith, which caused the bitterness. I would recommend that you use the lemon, as it cuts into the richness of the pork belly and lardons, but choose your lemon carefully - it should be as round as possible, not pointy, and should feel squishy when pressed, not firm. This indicates a lemon with thin pith. After quartering the lemon, check how thick the pith is and cut as much of the white pith away as possible, before chopping up the lemon. If it turns out your lemon has a thick white pith all over, zest it instead and add the lemon juice.