Beef fillet with red wine sauce

Beef fillet with red wine sauce

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(1 ratings)

Prep: 20 mins Cook: 1 hr, 30 mins plus at least 24 hrs marinating and resting

More effort

Serves 6 - 8
Luxuriously tender meat, soaked in a herby, garlicky marinade makes for a mouthwatering main course, fit for a feast

Nutrition and extra info

  • sauce only

Nutrition: per serving (8)

  • kcal636
  • fat42g
  • saturates14g
  • carbs5g
  • sugars4g
  • fibre1g
  • protein39g
  • salt1.8g
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Ingredients

  • 1.3kg well-aged beef fillet
    Beef

    Beef

    bee-f

    The classic cut of meat for a British Sunday roast, beef is full of flavour, as well as being a…

  • 50ml vegetable oil
  • 100g unsalted butter, cubed

For the marinade

  • 200ml olive oil
    olive oil

    Olive oil

    ol-iv oyl

    Probably the most widely-used oil in cooking, olive oil is pressed from fresh olives. It's…

  • ½ small pack thyme, leaves picked and roughly chopped

    Thyme

    This popular herb grows in Europe, especially the Mediterranean, and is a member of the mint…

  • 3 rosemary sprigs, leaves picked and roughly chopped
    Rosemary

    Rosemary

    rose-mar-ee

    Rosemary's intense, fragrant aroma has traditionally been paired with lamb, chicken and game…

  • 1 whole garlic bulb, top third cut off and discarded

For the red wine sauce

  • 250ml port
  • 500ml red wine
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 140g beef scraps (ask your butcher for these) or braising steak, chopped
    Beef

    Beef

    bee-f

    The classic cut of meat for a British Sunday roast, beef is full of flavour, as well as being a…

  • 4 shallots, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, bashed
  • 12 white peppercorns
  • ¼ small pack thyme

    Thyme

    This popular herb grows in Europe, especially the Mediterranean, and is a member of the mint…

  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1l beef stock

Method

  1. Put the beef in a container just big enough to fit snugly. Mix the marinade ingredients in a bowl and tip over the beef. Cover and chill, turning and basting as often as possible. Leave for 24-72 hrs.

  2. Pour the Port and wine into a large pan and simmer until reduced to a glaze. – this will take about 20 mins. Heat the oil in a separate large pan and, when almost smoking, add the beef scraps and cook until dark golden. Add the shallots, garlic, peppercorns and herbs. Fry for a few mins until starting to brown, then add the reduced alcohol and stock. Bring to a simmer and cook for 25 mins. Strain into a clean pan, then simmer for 8-10 mins until thickened. Season to taste and chill until needed.

  3. Heat oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6. Remove the fillet from the marinade and brush off the herbs, reserving them and the garlic for later. Heat the vegetable oil in a large pan. When almost smoking, add the fillet, season with 2 tsp salt and fry for 5-7 mins, turning every so often.

  4. Add the butter, cube by cube, and – when foaming – baste the fillet, turning regularly. When the fillet is caramelised, put in a roasting tin with the reserved herbs and garlic, and cook in the oven for 8-12 mins, turning every 4 mins and basting. To check that the beef is done, insert a probe thermometer into the centre – it should read 55-60C for medium rare. Transfer to a board, wrap loosely in foil and rest for 20 mins.

  5. Return the tin to the oven until the butter is hot. Before serving, roll the fillet in it. Serve with the sauce, croquettes, carrots and garlic.

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Comments, questions and tips

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SiNZ
13th Dec, 2015
5.05
I'm only rating the sauce, rather than the rest. I wanted a tasty red wine sauce to go with another dish and decided on this one. There's a fair bit of time involved for "just a sauce" but definitely worth it. You can make a fair bit of time in advance and reheat (two days later I used the leftover sauce on some venison medallions). I also used beef stir fry, as that's all I could get. It does mean "sacrificing" that beef for the sauce. You could eat it after, but it gets a bit tough from having all its juices cooked out. The onions and other solids left over from the sauce are so tasty.
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