Six things you should consider before starting a diet

Tempted to try the latest diet du jour? Make sure you have all the facts first. From fasting 5:2 to carb-curbing Paleo, here are the six things you should consider before starting any diet...

Six things you should consider before starting a diet

It's almost impossible to keep up with all the different diets that come in and out of the spotlight each month, and with the emergence of numerous Instagram and YouTube healthy eating 'gurus', it can be hard to distinguish between informed nutritional advice and fad diets. Here are six questions you should ask before embarking on any weight loss plan to help you determine if it will be effective and, most importantly, safe for you...

Does it provide enough kcalories (kcals)?

The average daily requirement is 2,500 kcals for men and 2,000 kcals for women  but when dieting, you’ll need to reduce your energy intake in order to burn off more than you consume. 

Nutritional therapist Kerry Torrens says, "A general guide is to aim for fat loss of 1lb per week. To achieve this, you need to create a deficit of 500 calories a day from your normal eating plan. The best way to start is to keep a food diary so you understand exactly how much and what you're eating and drinking." 

Identify where you can cut excess or empty calories, perhaps by eating smaller portions or by skipping snacks when you’re not hungry. Swapping sugar-sweetened or alcoholic drinks for low-calorie options is a good way to cut back without feeling hungry. 

Children, teenagers and pregnant women will have special calorie requirements, and should be supervised by a doctor when embarking on any restrictive eating plan. Similarly, those with a diagnosed medical condition should refer to their GP prior to commencing a weight loss plan.

Take our quiz to find out how many calories are in your favourite alcoholic beverages.

Is it balanced?

Diets that encourage cutting out or severely restricting entire food groups (e.g. carbohydrates) are likely to be unbalanced and difficult to maintain. Any diet that promotes eating mainly one type of food (such as the cabbage soup diet) may also put you at risk of nutritional deficiencies. Read our advice on eating a balanced diet to get an idea of what you need, whether you're male, female, vegetarian or vegan.
 

Is it sustainable?

Can you stick to the plan for a long period of time? What happens when the diet is over? If it's not something that you can fit into your lifestyle permanently, you're likely to revert back to your old eating habits. Can you make the plan fit around your commitments? If you eat out or travel a lot for work, try to plan in advance how you could work around these. If a plan is too rigid and prescriptive you'll have a hard time following it in the long-term.

 

Is it scientifically sound?

This is one of the hardest questions to answer. Looking into the background and qualifications of the person behind the diet might give you some indication of its legitimacy, but sometimes the answer isn’t that simple. As Kerry points out, "Even plans developed by trained medical practitioners are not without their critics – Atkins for example was formulated by an American Cardiologist, yet it recieved a huge amount of criticism, and still does. If you want guidance and reassurance that you're following a well-balanced diet you should seek the help of a registered dietitian."
 

Is the final goal realistic?

Diets which promise dramatic weight loss are unlikely to deliver the quick-fix results you’re after, and even if they do, they may not be desirable. ‘As a general guide, between 0.5lb and 2lbs a week is considered a safe amount of weight loss per week’, Kerry says. It's also important to aim for a suitable goal weight - even if you lose the weight slowly and sensibly, you don't want to risk losing too much and becoming underweight. The NHS offer an easy-to-understand tool to calculate your BMI - use this to work out what your BMI is right now, and whether your target weight is healthy for you.
 

Is it safe?

Just because friends or family have had success with a particular diet doesn't mean that it is the right plan for you too. It's always advisable to see your GP before starting a weight loss plan, but especially important for those with existing medical conditions, including any history of eating disorders.

Read more about popular diets....

What is the 5:2 diet?
What is the Paleo diet?
What is the Atkins diet?
What is the Dukan diet?
Read up on more popular diets

Have you tried, or been tempted to try, a weight loss plan? Let us know in the comments below...


A registered Nutritional Therapist, Kerry Torrens is a contributing author to a number of nutritional and cookery publications including BBC Good Food magazine. Kerry is a member of the The Royal Society of Medicine, Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC), British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT).

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact  your local health care provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

Comments, questions and tips

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DBridges
12th Jul, 2016
Dear BBC Good Food, Please consider employing registered dietitians rather than "nutritional therapists". Dietitians are regulated by law and thus abide to the highest standards of ethics and scientific research. Nutritionists can (under NHS guidelines) voluntarily sign up to a register (UKVRN) which Kerry Torrens does not appear to be on. I recently bought a diploma as a nutritional therapist to replace my BSc (Hons) in Nutrition and Dietetics and my PhD in Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, for the low, low price of £29.99. I would be keen to speak with a revered colleague such as Kerry Torrens.
sarahfairlamb's picture
sarahfairlamb
27th Jul, 2017
Are you disputing her advice or that she is not qualified to give it?
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