Angela’s lighter chocolate tart

Angela’s lighter chocolate tart

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(9 ratings)

Prep: 35 mins Cook: 25 mins Plus chilling

More effort

Makes 8 slices
A chocolate tart with a rich taste and moussey texture – but with two-thirds less fat than the classic version

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal243
  • fat13.4g
  • saturates7.3g
  • carbs25.8g
  • sugars13.7g
  • fibre1.3g
  • protein4.4g
  • salt0.3g
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Ingredients

    For the pastry

    • 140g plain flour, plus extra for dusting
    • 50g butter, cut into pieces
      Butter

      Butter

      butt-err

      Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

    • 2 tsp cocoa powder
    • 1 tbsp icing sugar
    • 1 tbsp rapeseed oil
      Rapeseed oil

      Rapeseed oil

      If you want a light alternative to other cooking oils, rapeseed is a great choice and has…

    • 1 medium egg yolk
    • half-fat crème fraîche, to serve (optional)

    For the filling

    • 100g dark chocolate, 70% cocoa solids, very finely chopped
      Dark chocolate soup pots with double cream in spoons

      Dark chocolate

      dahk chok-lit

      Dark chocolate means the shiny, dark-reddish brown treat produced from the cacao bean, theobroma…

    • 1 tbsp cocoa powder, plus extra ½ tsp for sifting
    • ¾ tsp coffee granules
    • ½ tsp vanilla extract
    • 2 tbsp semi-skimmed milk
    • 2 medium egg whites
    • 2 tbsp dark muscovado sugar
    • 85g half-fat crème fraîche

    Method

    1. Tip the flour into a mixing bowl and remove 2 tsp (the cocoa will replace it later). Add the butter and rub into the flour until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Sift in the cocoa and icing sugar, then, using a round-bladed knife, stir in the oil, egg yolk and 1½-2 tbsp cold water, until the dough comes together. Gently gather into a ball, then roll out on a lightly floured surface, big enough to fit a 20cm round x 3.5cm-deep loose-bottomed flan tin. Ease the pastry into the tin, leaving a slight overhang. Lightly prick the base with a fork, then chill for about 10 mins.

    2. Heat oven to 190C/170C fan/gas 5. Sit tin on a baking sheet. Line the pastry with foil and fill with baking beans. Blind-bake for 15 mins or until set. Carefully lift out the beans and paper, then bake the pastry case for another 10 mins or until the base is cooked. Remove, carefully trim off the overhanging pastry with a sharp knife, to give the pastry a flat edge, then leave until completely cold.

    3. To make the filling, put the chocolate in a large bowl that will fit over a pan of simmering water without touching it. Mix the cocoa, coffee and vanilla with the milk. Pour over the chocolate. Sit the bowl over a pan of gently simmering water, stir, then immediately remove pan from the heat, with the bowl of chocolate still over the water, stirring occasionally, to check when melted. Stir the melted chocolate – it will be quite thick. Stir in 2 tbsp boiling water and the chocolate will immediately thin down and become silky smooth. Take the bowl off the pan and leave to cool slightly.

    4. Whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks, then whisk in the sugar until thick and glossy. Fold the créme fraîche into the cooled chocolate. Fold one-third of the egg whites into the chocolate mixture using a large metal spoon, then very gently fold in the remaining whites, a third at a time, until evenly mixed in. Remove the pastry case from the tin and place on a serving plate. Spoon the filling into the case, then spread out gently and evenly. Chill for about 3 hours, or overnight, before serving. Serve with a sifting of cocoa and half-fat créme fraîche, if you like. Please note, pregnant women, the elderly, babies and toddlers, and people who are generally unwell, should avoid eating raw or partially cooked eggs.

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    Comments, questions and tips

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    newdawn60
    14th Oct, 2012
    Can I leave out the egg whites, what can I replace them with.
    mcritchie1
    7th Jul, 2012
    5.05
    I loved this recipe, it was so tasty! I used the smaller individual cases and don't know if it was just beginners luck but they turned out really well. The mousse was so light, I left out the coffee granules and they turned out really well. My friends loved it, will def make them again!
    cityofmist
    23rd May, 2012
    Would it be possible to make this three or four days in advance and then freeze it?
    playfair
    11th Apr, 2012
    4.05
    Not too difficult to make but found that it tasted so much better on the second day.
    annethechef
    21st Mar, 2012
    Please could you print some Gluten free recipes both savory and sweet? Thank you Anne
    icedancer99
    21st Mar, 2012
    Do you think you could just make the inside and bake it in pots in a water tray and make chocolate mousse... ?? The tart was great but the pastry cracked a bit. I also love a good chocolate mousse !
    gooseberries
    26th Feb, 2012
    I plan on making this recipe soon, but for those struggling with the pastry, it would make sense to chill it for 20 minutes or so before rolling to stop it shrinking and cracking when cooked.
    jennypiccolo
    14th Feb, 2012
    4.05
    I found the pastry making experience very painful, it came out of the oven after blind baking all cracked and really not looking good. So I decided to bin it - tasted it first and felt it was really tasteless. So I started again with a normal sweet Shortcrust pastry which behaved really well, and then continued with the recipe above. The filling only came halfway up the tart shell so I made the same amount of filling again and it looked a lot better. The end result was fab. Really tasty and I would make it again - with a regular pastry case and double the amount of filling.
    emmaleg
    5th Feb, 2012
    5.05
    This was really lovely - a lot less stodgy than many chocolate tarts. I thought the pastry was a bit temperamental - it cracked a lot and pieces broke off which slightly spolied the overall look of the tart although it did taste nice. I'd definitely make the tart again, hats off to Angela for another successful makeover!
    e_leachums
    25th Jan, 2012
    Rebecca, if you like oranges the Orange & caramel custard tart on this website is pretty good...

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