Rosy quince & cranberry jelly

Rosy quince & cranberry jelly

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(1 ratings)

Prep: 30 mins Cook: 1 hr, 30 mins - 1 hr, 45 mins plus overnight straining

More effort

Makes 3-4 standard jam jars
This tangy jelly makes a fantastic accompaniment to your Christmas roast turkey, pork pie, ham or cheeseboard - or a gorgeous gift

Nutrition and extra info

  • Gluten-free
  • Vegetarian

Nutrition: per tbsp

  • kcal46
  • fat0g
  • saturates0g
  • carbs11g
  • sugars11g
  • fibre0g
  • protein0g
  • salt0g
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Ingredients

  • 4 large quinces, roughly chopped
    Quince

    Quince

    kwin-s

    The two different shapes - apple and pear in which quinces grow are an obvious clue to the…

  • 450g Bramley apples, roughly chopped – don’t worry about coring
    Bramley apples

    Bramley apple

    bram-lee app-el

    A large, flattish cooking apple, green in appearance but sometimes with specks of red. The flesh…

  • 450g fresh or frozen cranberries
    Cranberries

    Cranberry

    A tart, ruby-red coloured berry which grows wild on shrubs throughout northern Europe and North…

  • 1kg bag preserving sugar (not with added pectin)
    Sugar

    Sugar

    shuh-ga

    Honey and syrups made from concentrated fruit juice were the earliest known sweeteners. Today,…

  • 1 tsp rosewater
  • a few small, fresh bay leaves, to decorate the jars (optional)

Method

  1. Put the quinces, apples and cranberries in a large pan. Cover with water and bring to the boil, then turn down the heat and cook more gently for about 1 hr until the fruit is really soft.

  2. Hang a jelly bag over a large mixing bowl, tip the fruit in and let it drip overnight – don’t be tempted to squeeze the bag, or the pulp will come through and your jelly will be murky.

  3. The next day, measure the amount of juice you have and, for every 1ml of liquid, match with grams of the sugar (so for 500ml you’d need 500g sugar). Tip both into a preserving pan, or large pan, and bring slowly to the boil, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Increase the heat once the sugar has gone and boil until it reaches 110C on a sugar thermometer.

  4. Skim any scum off the surface of the liquid, then stir in the rosewater. Ladle into sterilised jars (see below left), adding a bay leaf to each one, if you like, and cover with lids – or wax discs, cellophane and elastic bands.

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Comments, questions and tips

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clarice
7th Dec, 2014
5.05
This is a lovely preserve, amazing colour and flavour. You could leave out the rosewater if you don't like the floral taste.
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