Pork Wellington

Pork Wellington

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
(4 ratings)

Prep: 45 mins Cook: 1 hr plus chilling

A challenge

Serves 6 - 8

A twist on the classic beef Wellington with a succulent fillet of pork and a rich mustard and cream sauce. Treat yourself to the ultimate posh sausage roll

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition: per serving (8)

  • kcal709
  • fat53g
  • saturates27g
  • carbs22g
  • sugars2g
  • fibre2g
  • protein33g
  • salt2.2g
Save to My Good Food
Please sign in or register to save recipes.

Ingredients

  • olive oil, for frying
    olive oil

    Olive oil

    ol-iv oyl

    Probably the most widely-used oil in cooking, olive oil is pressed from fresh olives. It's…

  • 2 large pork fillets (approx 800g), trimmed and the ends removed
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
    Shallot

    Shallot

    shal-lot

    Related to the onion (as opposed to being a younger version of it), shallots grow in clusters at…

  • 50g butter
    Butter

    Butter

    butt-err

    Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

  • 150g wild mushrooms (such as chanterelles), finely chopped
  • handful sage, picked and chopped
    Sage

    Sage

    sa-age

    Popular in both Italian and British cookery, sage has long, grey-green leaves with a slightly…

  • handful parsley, chopped
    Parsley

    Parsley

    par-slee

    One of the most ubiquitous herbs in British cookery, parsley is also popular in European and…

  • good handful chives, snipped
  • 100g spinach
    Spinach

    Spinach

    spin-atch

    Used in almost every cuisine across the world, spinach is an enormously popular green vegetable…

  • 10 slices prosciutto
    Prosciutto

    Prosciutto

    proh-shoo-toe

    Prosciutto is sweet, delicate ham intended to be eaten raw. The word 'prosciutto' is the…

  • 50g good-quality chicken liver pâté

For the pastry

  • 500g pack puff pastry
  • plain flour, for dusting
  • 2 egg yolks, beaten with 1 tsp water

For the mustard

  • 300ml pot double cream
  • 3 tbsp Dijon mustard

Method

  1. Heat a pan with a little oil to a very high heat and season the pork fillets well all over. Put 1 fillet in the pan and fry for 2 mins to give it a little colour all over. Remove and repeat with the other fillet, then leave both to rest and cool.

  2. Fry the shallot in the butter in the same pan for 2 mins, then add the mushrooms and cook until both are soft. Add the herbs and cook for 1 min. Season, tip 1/ 3 of the mixture into one bowl (reserved for the sauce) and the rest into another, and set aside to cool. Don’t wash the pan.

  3. Meanwhile, heat a little oil in another large pan, add the spinach and cook briefly until wilted. Set aside until cool enough to squeeze out all the excess moisture, then chop. Tip the spinach into the first pan and use it to wipe up all the seasoning and juices.

  4. Overlap two pieces of cling film over a large chopping board. Lay the slices of prosciutto on the cling film in two rows, slightly overlapping. Carefully spread the pâté mixture over the prosciutto, then sit the pork fillets on top. Pack the mushrooms in the gaps, then top with the spinach. Use the cling film to draw the prosciutto around the fillet mixture, then roll it into a sausage shape, twisting the ends of cling film to tighten it as you go. Chill while you roll out the pastry.

  5. Dust the work surface with a little flour. Roll out a third of the pastry to an 18 x 30cm strip about 2mm thick and place on a non-stick baking sheet. Roll out the remainder of the pastry to about 28 x 36cm, also 2mm thick. Unroll the fillet from the cling film and sit it in the centre of the smaller strip of pastry. Brush the pastry’s edges with the yolk mixture, as well as the top and sides of the wrapped fillet. Using a rolling pin, lift and drape the larger piece of pastry over the fillet, pressing well into the sides. Trim the joins to about a 4cm rim. Seal the rim with the edge of a spoon handle. Glaze all over with more egg yolk and, if you like, mark the Wellington using the back of a knife, taking care not to cut into the pastry. Chill for at least 30 mins or up to 24 hrs.

  6. 6 Heat oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6. Brush the Wellington with a little more egg yolk and cook for 35-40 mins until golden – the pork will be just pink in the middle. Allow to stand for 10 mins before serving in thick slices.

  7. To make the sauce, bring the cream to the boil, add the mustard and reserved mushroom mixture, and remove from the heat. Season and stir well before serving.

You may also like

Ads by Google

Comments, questions and tips

Sign in or create your My Good Food account to join the discussion.
faceman77
10th Dec, 2017
5.05
Done this twice and both times were delicious. Takes a bit of time but well worth the effort. A nice lighter version of the standard beef Wellington.
Ryan5977
2nd Jan, 2017
3.8
I made this last week. I agree with a previous comment that it was quite challenging and prep time was certainly more than 45mins. I have a real aversion to mushrooms so substituted these with crumbled black pudding. This worked really well and complimented the pork while replacing the "earthy" flavour of mushrooms.
Munchies41
27th Dec, 2016
5.05
I chose this recipe for a dinner party and made it to step 5 the night before it was needed. This worked perfectly as it allowed me to enjoy being with my friends while it cooked. It looked the part and was delicious.
Lyme Regis
26th Dec, 2016
We had this as our Christmas dinner. It was very nice but it does take quite a time to prepare certainly a lot longer than 45 minutes ! I would have it again but on on special occasions. We are looking forward to having the rest cold tomorrow.
Arthur Smythe
14th Dec, 2017
Wife and I are having guests over on the weekend and they don't eat pork for religious reasons. Is it possible to substitute the pork for beef?
erinmcfee
21st Dec, 2016
Could I substitute pork fillets for a pork butt roast? How would that impact cooking time?
goodfoodteam's picture
goodfoodteam
24th Dec, 2016
Thank you for your question. We have not tested this recipe using an alternative pork cut and would recommend choosing fillet for best results.
Be the first to suggest a tip for this recipe...Got your own twist on this recipe? Or do you have suggestions for possible swaps and additions? We’d love to hear your ideas.