Mr McGregor’s rabbit pie

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(3 ratings)

Prep: 45 mins Cook: 1 hr, 25 mins

More effort

Serves 3
This shortcrust pie has a creamy leek, mustard, cider and fennel sauce. Serve with buttery radishes, baby carrots and peas

Nutrition and extra info

  • Freezable

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal786
  • fat45g
  • saturates16g
  • carbs54g
  • sugars6g
  • fibre5g
  • protein32g
  • salt1.6g
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Ingredients

  • about 400g rabbit joints (or 250-300g diced rabbit meat)
  • 3 tbsp plain flour, plus a little extra for dusting
  • 2 tbsp sunflower oil
    Sunflower oil

    Sunflower oil

    A variety of oils can be used for baking. Sunflower is the one we use most often at Good Food as…

  • 1 small-ish leek, finely sliced
    Leeks

    Leek

    lee-k

    Like garlic and onion, leeks are a member of the allium family, but have their own distinct…

  • 1 tsp fennel seed
    Fennel seeds

    Fennel seeds

    feh-nell seeds

    A dried seed that comes from the fennel herb, fennel seeds look like cumin seeds, only greener,…

  • 150ml medium cider
    Cider

    Cider

    si-der

    Cider is an alcoholic beverage made from the fermented juice of apples. Apple orchards were…

  • 500ml chicken stock
  • 4 tbsp double cream
  • 1 tbsp wholegrain mustard
  • 1 sheet ready-rolled shortcrust pastry (all-butter has the best flavour) - if you don't want to lattice the top of your pie, just use ½ a sheet
  • 1 egg, beaten, for glazing
    Eggs

    Egg

    egg

    The ultimate convenience food, eggs are powerhouses of nutrition, packed with protein and a…

To serve

  • 140g baby carrot
  • 140g radish
    Radish

    Radish

    rad-ish

    The root of a member of the mustard family, radishes have a peppery flavour and a crisp, crunchy…

  • 140g pea
    Peas

    Peas

    p-ees

    A type of legume, peas grow inside long, plump pods. As is the case with all types of legume,…

  • 25g butter, diced
    Butter

    Butter

    butt-err

    Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

  • few pinches of sugar
    Sugar

    Sugar

    shuh-ga

    Honey and syrups made from concentrated fruit juice were the earliest known sweeteners. Today,…

Method

  1. Toss the rabbit joints (or diced meat) with half the flour and some seasoning. Heat half the oil in a flameproof casserole dish and brown the meat on all sides. Lift out the meat, add the remaining oil, the leek and fennel seeds, and fry gently until softened. Stir in the remaining flour until it has disappeared. Add the cider and scrape up any stuck bits on the dish as it comes to the boil, then add the stock, return the meat to the dish, and bring to a simmer.

  2. Cover and cook for 40-45 mins until the rabbit is really tender and falling from the bone. Lift out the meat and, while you’re shredding it from the bones in big chunks (if you’ve used joints), boil down the cooking liquid to about a third.

  3. Stir the cream and mustard into the liquid, taste for seasoning, then stir the rabbit back in. Spoon into a small pie dish or baking dish.

  4. Heat oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6. Stick a thin strip of pastry around the edge of the dish. Slice the remaining pastry into 2.5cm-wide strips with a floured knife, then weave into a tight lattice. Lift up carefully, using a rolling pin to help you, then stick on with a little beaten egg. Trim the edges to finish. Brush the top with more egg and bake for 25 mins until golden.

  5. Meanwhile, bring a saucepan of salted water to the boil. Add the carrots for 2 mins, then the radishes for 2 mins, followed by the peas for 1 min. Drain. When the pie is done, melt the butter in a small frying pan. Add the drained veg with the sugar, turn up the heat and fry to caramelise a little. Serve immediately alongside the pie.

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Comments, questions and tips

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PaulineG11
20th Oct, 2014
1.3
Not a huge success for me. I'd never cooked rabbit before (and probably won't again!) The meat (joints) needed 2 hours simmering time, at which point I gave up and cut it up anyway, despite it not falling off the bone. Too many little bones etc to pick out of the pie too as they got lost in the gravy! Shame- as those points aside it did have a nice taste.
Nee81
21st Sep, 2014
5.05
Love this recipe I used 4 dressed wild medium bunnies, popped them in the slow cooker for 4 hours and then pulled the meat. Also added 4-6 rashers of quality smokey bacon, absolutely beautiful made a family pie, everyone can't wait to have it again.
lucyashaw@googlemail.com's picture
lucyashaw@googl...
25th May, 2014
5.05
Absolutely loved this! I made it because of the name, even though I'm always a bit nervous cooking rabbit because it's so easy to dry it out. But this was moist and delicious! The balance of flavours was perfect too. Definitely worth the time it took to make it. The only changes I made were to make my own pastry, and to cut the simmering time from 45 minutes to 20 minutes.
Daisy@Cheaperseeker's picture
Daisy@Cheaperseeker
24th Apr, 2014
Great dish.Though never have chance to eat it ,still love it.
Wobblydeb
25th May, 2016
How long should the rabbit be cooked for if using diced meat without bones?
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