Mary Berry’s orange layer cake

Mary Berry’s orange layer cake

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  • Preparation and cooking time
    • Prep:
    • Cook:
  • Easy
  • Cuts into 8 slices

The queen of baking, Mary Berry, creates a light and fruity citrus sponge with buttery frosting and a sugar glaze

  • Freezable
Nutrition: per slice
HighlightNutrientUnit
kcal745
fat42g
saturates15g
carbs86g
sugars67g
fibre1g
protein6g
low insalt1.3g
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Ingredients

For the cake

For the butter icing

For the glaze

Method

  • STEP 1

    Heat oven to 180C/160C fan/gas 4. You will need 2 x 20cm loose-bottomed sandwich tins, greased and bases lined with baking parchment. Measure all the cake ingredients into a large bowl (reserve a little orange zest for decoration) and beat with a wooden spoon or electric hand mixer until combined and smooth.

  • STEP 2

    Divide evenly between the 2 tins. Bake for 20-25 mins or until well risen, lightly golden and shrinking away from the sides of the tins. After 5 mins, remove from the tins and leave to cool on a wire rack.

  • STEP 3

    To make the icing, put the butter and icing sugar into a bowl and mix with an electric hand mixer until light and fluffy. Stir in the orange zest.

  • STEP 4

    Remove the paper from the cakes. Sit 1 cake upside down on a plate. Make the glaze by putting the caster sugar and orange juice into a saucepan, stirring over a low heat until the sugar has dissolved. Boil until reduced by half, then brush half on the upside-down cake, using a pastry brush. Spread half the butter icing over the glazed cake. Sit the other cake on top, brush with the remaining glaze, then spread with the remaining butter icing. Scatter with the reserved orange zest. The cake is best eaten on the day, but will keep for up to 3 days in a cool place. It freezes well un-iced or filled.

RECIPE TIPS
USE THE RIGHT SUGAR FOR CREAMING
It’s important to use caster sugar when following a creamed cake method. It is really finely ground, meaning it creams well with the butter to give you a light sponge. At BBC Good Food, we like to use golden caster sugar as it is unrefined, unlike white caster sugar, which is heavily processed.
MARY BERRY AND LUCY YOUNG 'AT HOME'
This recipe was taken from Mary Berry and Lucy Young At Home, a collection of Mary’s favourite family recipes. Text (c) Mary Berry 2013, image (c) Woodlands books 2013

Goes well with

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    Rating: 5 out of 5.53 ratings
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