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Indian rice pudding (kheer) served in three bowls

Kheer

A star rating of 4.5 out of 5.2 ratingsRate
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  • Preparation and cooking time
    • Prep:
    • Cook:
  • Easy
  • Serves 6

Make this indulgent slow-cooked Indian rice pudding with our easy kheer recipe. Studded with dried fruit, it has a sweetly spiced floral flavour and a lovely creaminess

  • Gluten-free
  • Vegetarian
Nutrition: Per serving
NutrientUnit
kcal414
fat24g
saturates13g
carbs51g
sugars37g
fibre1g
protein14g
salt0.4g
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Ingredients

  • ½ tsp saffron strands
  • 2 litres whole milk
  • 20 green cardamom pods, pierced with the point of a knife
  • 100g basmati or long-grain rice
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 100ml double cream
  • 2 tsp pure rosewater
  • 2 tbsp flaked almonds, toasted
  • 50g raisins, soaked in hot water

Method

  • STEP 1

    Put the saffron strands in a small bowl and cover with 2-3 tbsp warm water. Gently push the strands against the side of the bowl with the back of a teaspoon – this will help release the flavour and colour. Set aside to soak until needed.

  • STEP 2

    Pour the milk into a large, heavy-based pan set over a medium heat and tip in the cardamom pods. Bring to the boil, then scatter in the rice and reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 40 mins, stirring often to prevent the rice scorching on the base of the pan, until the rice has broken down and is very soft.

  • STEP 3

    Stir in the sugar and continue to cook until it has dissolved. Scoop out the cardamom pods using a slotted spoon and discard these.

  • STEP 4

    Stir in the cream, then slowly add the rosewater and enough of the saffron and its soaking liquid to just lightly flavour the kheer. Stir in the almonds. Drain the raisins and stir these in, then serve hot or leave to cool completely and chill first.

RECIPE TIPS

CELEBRATION 
In South India, this dessert is often made with jaggery or date palm sugar and served at the harvest festival of Pongal on 14 January. In North India, the festival is called Lohri and celebrated on 13 January.

Goes well with

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A star rating of 4.5 out of 5.2 ratings
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