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Ham hock & mustard terrine

Ham hock & mustard terrine

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  • Preparation and cooking time
    • Prep:
    • Cook:
    • Plus chilling
  • More effort
  • Serves 8

Cured slow-cooked pork is a great foundation for a coarse pâté style starter and can be made in advance

Nutrition: per serving
NutrientUnit
kcal219
fat8g
saturates2g
carbs2g
sugars2g
fibre0g
protein33g
salt3.26g
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Ingredients

For the stock

Method

  • STEP 1

    Put the ham hocks in a large pan with the stock ingredients. Cover with cold water. Set pan over a high heat and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to a simmer, cook for 2 and a half to 3 hrs or until the meat falls from the bone. Leave to cool in the pan.

  • STEP 2

    Grease a 1-litre terrine mould or loaf tin with the oil, then line with cling film. Remove the hocks, then strain the stock through a fine sieve into a pan. Set aside.

  • STEP 3

    Shred the ham, leaving some large chunks, removing as much fat and sinew as possible. In a large bowl, mix the ham with the mustard and parsley. Press the mixture into the prepared terrine.

  • STEP 4

    Bring the reserved stock back to a rapid boil and reduce by half. You should have about 600ml/1pt liquid remaining. Remove from the heat. Meanwhile, soak the gelatine in cold water for 5 mins to soften. Remove from the water, then squeeze out any excess liquid. Add the gelatine to the hot stock and stir well.

  • STEP 5

    Pour enough of the stock over the ham to just cover. Tap terrine firmly on a hard surface to knock out air pockets, then cover with cling film. Chill for 3-4 hrs or overnight. To serve, remove from the mould and carve into chunky slices. Serve with caper berries and toast.

RECIPE TIPS
HAM HOCKS

These are the same cut of meat as a pork knuckle or lamb shank (from the base of the leg), but the pork has been cured. The meat is full of flavour, but needs long, slow cooking. It’s best to order the hocks in advance from your butcher.

Goes well with

Recipe from Good Food magazine, December 2011

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A star rating of 3.8 out of 5.12 ratings
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