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Good Food's Healthy Diet Plan - January 2018

    Sign up for BBC Good Food's brand-new, FREE Healthy Diet Plan for January 2018 and receive the complete menu, recipes, shopping list and more.

    BBC Good Food's Healthy Diet Plan logo on a blue background

    Kick-start the New Year with our latest Healthy Diet Plan.
    Sign up for free today!

     

     

    If you're having trouble signing up with the above form you can also send your name and email address to goodfoodwebsite@bbc.com and we'll add you to the list.

    We'll help you to maintain your healthy habits by keeping you informed of new BBC Good Food health & fitness initiatives. We’d also love your feedback once you’ve completed the 7-day plan, so don’t be shy about sending us an email at goodfoodwebsite@bbc.com.

    All about our Healthy Diet Plan for January 2018

    Over 195,000 people have now signed up for our delicious and nutritious Healthy Diet Plans — and the feedback shows that you love them as much as we do!

    With triple-testing and careful nutritional analysis, we believe we've developed the perfect formula to boost health and wellbeing in the tastiest way possible.

    Our brand-new plan serves two people for one week and brings you 16 brand-new recipes that are quick, easy, practical and minimise waste. When you sign up you'll receive an email that contains everything you need to follow the plan, with two separate links — one for the meat-eaters' menu and another for the vegetarian plan. You'll also get a printable shopping list, plus plenty of tips, tricks and additional healthy recipes to help you continue eating well once you've finished the plan.

    What are the benefits of this plan?

    Whether you're aiming to lose weight, increase your energy levels or just glow with health, our brand-new Healthy Diet plan is here to help. We've combined brand-new recipes and expert advice from our nutritional therapist, Kerry Torrens, to bring you a 7-day menu that will help you to look and feel fantastic.

    At BBC Good Food we believe that the healthiest way of eating is focused around whole, natural foods, and our diet plans are no different. All the recipes are packed with healthy fats, lean protein and slow-release carbs, as well as minimising processed products. We've also included a variety of meaty, vegetarian and vegan recipes throughout the week.

    The results? You can expect to...

    • Cut down on added sugar
    • Increase your energy levels
    • Improve your digestion
    • Lose excess weight
    • Support your immune system

    Our Healthy Diet Plan recipes are bursting with protective antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and phyto-nutrients to lift your mood and keep you fuller for longer, so helping you feel your very best. We've also ensured that each day provides a balance of protein, fats and carbs to help manage hormones and keep blood sugar levels in check, while curbing cravings.

    About the recipes

    When you sign up to the plan, you can access an at-a-glance chart to see your weekly menu. Eaten in the recommended order, each day will deliver a balance of protein, fat and carbs, helping to manage hormonal and blood sugar levels, as well as optimal nutrient levels each day. You'll also achieve all five of your five-a-day and keep within the recommended Reference Intakes (RI) for fats, protein, sugar, salt and kcals while following the latest guidance on your intake of 'free' sugars.

    For those who want to lose weight, the daily calorie count of 1,500 kcals is likely to create a moderate shortfall, allowing for steady and controlled weight loss. While we recommend following the plan in order, if you want to swap or repeat days, you'll still reap all the benefits of eating whole, nourishing foods.

    The recipes make enough for two people for seven days, and have been written by food writer Sara Buenfeld and analysed by nutritional therapist Kerry Torrens. You can read more about the nutritional benefits of each recipe, along with Kerry's top tips for achieving your goals, when you sign up.

    We understand that diet plans can be time-consuming, so we've given tips for getting ahead and attempted to keep preparation and cooking times to a minimum. We've aimed to keep ingredient costs down and reduce waste, though there may be the odd occasion where you can enjoy leftovers for another meal. If you have questions or comments about any of the recipes, our cookery team are keen to hear them – please send an email to goodfoodwebsite@bbc.com.

    Discover more...

    All our FREE Healthy Diet Plans
    More health and nutrition tips
    Fitness inspiration and guides


    Please note, the Healthy Diet Plan newsletter is completely separate to BBC Good Food’s regular weekly newsletter.

    All health content from BBC Good Food is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. Any healthy diet plan featured by BBC Good Food is provided as a suggestion of a general balanced diet and should not be relied upon to meet specific dietary requirements. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local health care provider.

    Comments, questions and tips

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    ansvar1
    14th Jan, 2018
    I cannot see any mention of the need to use organic food in a healthy diet, ie a diet free of pesticides etc. The supermarkets listed, apart from Ocado perhaps, do not have the organic ingredients.
    rodslot53
    9th Jan, 2018
    I am a 64 year old man living on his own, and I am needing to lose weight. Some of the recipes look brilliant but are for 2 or 4 people. Can you suggest recipes, that take a short time to prep and cook, but suitable for one person.
    deliciouslyellie's picture
    deliciouslyellie
    12th Jan, 2018
    If you make the larger batches as they are and then freeze them in portion controlled boxes then you can save them for later in the week/month and have something different every day on a bit of a long term rota - better long term on the wallet, and great for when you have busy days run out of inspiration or simply don't feel like cooking. sometimes its cheaper and easier to buy ingredients in these portions already so you wont waste things that go off quickly (like a whole packet of veg) as you have cooked and frozen it. I'm a student and this is what I do to save me some time and money.
    Count Iblis
    6th Jan, 2018
    Sticking to 5 a day and staying within the RI for salt, fats etc., while better than failing to do that, is by far not good enough. The salt intake should ideally be no more than something of the order of a tenth of a gram per day, see here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1132118 https://academic.oup.com/ije/article/31/2/320/617698 The fat intake should be way less than the RI, see these articles: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/mar/17/tsimane-of-the-bolivian-amazon-have-worlds-healthiest-hearts-says-study https://academic.oup.com/ije/article/41/5/1221/712631 We should drastically reduce our meat and dairy intake and get our essential amino acids from fruits vegetables. This means eating vast amounts of fruits and vegetables, of the order of a kg of day. This then yields not only the required proteins, but also many other useful compounds for the body. The energy intake should be a lot more than the RI, at least 3500 Kcal/day. This requires doing a lot more exercise than the recommended amount like running an hour day which will burn 1000 Kcal. You can then eat enough to get your nutrients from whole grain carbs and vegetables. The essential Omega-3 and Omega-6 fats can be obtained from nuts and seeds. If we stop using cooking oils that contain an unnatural fat composition, then after a few years the fat cells will be filled with a lot more Omega-3 and Omega-6 fats. The enzymes that convert Omega-3 to the long-chained DHA and EPA forms are not so effective in most people because they are now interacting with the wrong fats. That's why we now need to eat fish quite regularly or use fortified foods to get enough of the long-chained Omega-3 fats.
    tessaann
    2nd Jan, 2018
    Why do all your main meals on the meat diet have to be spicy? What is wrong with keeping to a more traditional British main meal. Not everyone like Chilli this and Curry that. I think that I can produce a better menu than you. How about a Shepherd/Cottage Pie - Mince, Onion, Carrot, Tomato with Herbs, and a Parsnip and Swede mash topping. Still getting your 5 a day but with no Chilli, or Curry spices. And this is just a suggestion for one meal.
    rlcpayne
    8th Jan, 2018
    Personally, I like a variety of herbs & spices in my meals. I cook a lot and do also do both traditional English and highly flavoured international meals at home. Spices (including mustard & pepper used in English cooking) can enhance or substitute lost flavour when removing additional salt and fat. I am sure there are lots of people who will enjoy the flavour combinations suggested. At the end of the day, no recipe has to be stuck to exactly, but they are a good base to start from.
    Marilyn Chapman's picture
    Marilyn Chapman
    2nd Jan, 2018
    I thought halloumi and avacardo are full fats.
    Minsh13
    5th Jan, 2018
    Halloumi and Avocado are good, healthy fats - like oily fish
    janlc62
    17th Jan, 2018
    all heavy in calories regardless of whether it is a healthy fat.
    Ssscookie
    6th Jan, 2018
    Sorry minsh13 - halloumi’s a cheese so no good fats there. Everything in moderation though ;-) But avo full of the good stuff...
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