Spotlight on… heart disease

  • By
    Jo Lewin - Nutritional therapist

Coronary heart disease is the single biggest killer in the UK today. While some risk factors are non-modifiable, there are many lifestyle choices you can make that can help to keep your heart healthy. Nutritionist Jo Lewin explores the effect different foods have on heart health and suggests recipes to help you on your way…

Spotlight on… heart disease

We are repeatedly told that eating a balanced diet can improve our health, both now and in the future. Diet plays an important role in the prevention of coronary heart disease. Maintaining a healthy weight can also help keep blood pressure within the normal range.

 

What is Cardiovascular Disease (CVD)

CVD includes all diseases of the heart and circulation including coronary heart disease (angina and heart attack) heart failure and stroke. CHD and stroke may be caused by the process of atherosclerosis, which happens when the arteries (that supply the heart and brain with oxygen-rich blood) become narrowed by a gradual build up of fatty material within their walls. In time, the arteries may become so narrow that they cannot deliver enough oxygenated blood to the heart muscle when it needs it. The pain or discomfort that this can cause is called angina. A heart attack can cause permanent damange and happens when a narrowed coronary artery becomes blocked by a blood clot, so oxygenated blood cannot reach the heart. A stroke happens when a blood clot blocks an artery that carries blood to the brain or when a blood vessel bursts and bleeds into the brain – starving brain cells of oxygenated blood.  

 

Risk factors

There are certain things about you and your lifestyle that can increase your risk. Risk factors that you can do something about include:

  • SmokingSmoking
     
  • Having high cholesterol
     
  • High blood pressure
     
  • Being overweight
     
  • Having diabetes
     
  • Being physically inactive
     

Risk factors that you can’t control include:

  • Family history of cardiovascular disease
     
  • Your ethinic background
     
  • Your age – the older you are, the more at risk you are of developing cardiovascular disease
     
  • Your sex - research shows that men are more likely to develop CHD at an earlier age than women

 

How food and drink affects your heart
 

Get your five-a-day

Eating a diet rich in a range of fruits and vegetables can help to lower the risk of heart disease. Fruit and vegetables are full of vitaminsminerals, fibre and other nutrients, all of which may play a role in helping to reduce our risk of coronary heart disease in different ways. Fresh, frozen, chilled, canned or dried fruit and vegetables along with beans, pulses and 100%, unsweetened juice (not from concentrate) all count. Aim to eat at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables a day. 

Tuna, rainbow salad

Recipe suggestions - get on your way to five-a-day:
Tuna rainbow salad
Shredded green salad
Spiced root vegetable soup

Fruit and vegetables are rich in antioxidants and potassium, a mineral that may help to control blood pressure and regulate your heartbeat. Fruit, green leafy vegetables and root veg are also rich in folate, which is essential for the formation of blood cells and helps control the level of homocysteine in the blood. There is growing evidence that people with high levels of homocysteine may have a higher risk of CHD.
 

Fat

The message regarding this macronutrient is clear. Eat less, particularly saturated fat. There are two main types of fats in foods: saturated and unsaturated fats. A diet low in saturated fats can lower your blood cholesterol, prevent weight gain and reduce risk of CHD. 

Cholesterol is a fatty substance carried around in the body by proteins. Good cholesterol (HDL)  plays a vital role in the body but too much bad cholesterol (LDL) in the blood can increase the risk of CHD. Although some foods like eggs, prawns and liver do contain cholesterol, it’s actually the amount of saturated fat we eat that is more likely to affect our cholesterol levels. Replace saturated fat with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in olive oil, avocado, nuts and seeds (and their oils). Cut down on pastries, crisps and biscuits and eat more fruit and vegetables. Fill up on starchy foods such as rice, bread and pasta, particularly the wholegrain varieties.

Recipe suggestions - fill up on healthy, unsaturated fats:
Avocado salad
Broccoli lemon chicken with cashews
The health benefits of nuts

 

Oily fish

Aim to eat two portions of fish a week. Oily fish provides the richest source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fats that can help lower blood triglyceride levels. Eating oily fish regularly can help to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.  Choose oily fish such as herring, mackerel, pilchards, sardines, salmon and trout.

Recipe suggestions – heart-healthy fish suppers:Salmon
Tangy trout
Super healthy salmon salad
Grilled mackerel with soy, lime & ginger

If you don’t like oily fish, there are some vegetarian sources of omega-3 fats that you can include in your diet. These include flaxseeds, flaxseed oil, rape seeds and walnuts. The amount of omega-3 fats in these foods is less than you find in oily fish.

 

Fibre

Fibre can also help reduce the amount of cholesterol absorbed into your bloodstream. Try to include, porridge oats, beans, pulses, lentils, nuts, fruits and vegetables. They are all high in soluble fibre, which can help lower cholesterol. A high fibre diet also helps fill you up, making you less likely to snack on fattening foods. 

Recipe suggestions – high-fibre favourites:
Vegetable & bean chilli
Courgette, pea & pesto soup
Apple & blueberry bircher

 

Salt 
Try to reduce the amount of salt you eat as regularly eating too much is linked to raised blood pressure. On average, people in the UK are eating more salt than they need. It is recommended that adults have no more than 6 grams of salt a day. That is about one teaspoonful.  Don’t add salt to your food at the table and try to use herbs, garlic, spices or lemon juice to add flavour. 

low-salt breakfasts

Salt is hidden in foods such as packet/canned products, instant noodles, soups, ketchups, sauces and salty savoury snacks, as well as the everyday foods we eat like bread and breakfast cereals, so it’s important to use nutritional information on the front or back of packs to make low salt choices. Often salt is listed as sodium on packaged food. To convert the figure for sodium to salt, you need to multiply by 2.5. Many everyday foods such as bread and cereals contain a lot of salt too. 

Recipe suggestions – slash the salt in all your meals:
Low-salt breakfast recipes
Low-salt lunches
Low-salt dinner ideas



Processed foods
Often high in saturated fat, salt and sugar, processed foods can pose a quandry when trying to eat healthily. Try cooking from scratch, using basic, fresh and if possible, seasonal ingredients. Also check food labels.

Alcohol
It’s important to stick to recommended limits for alcohol of no more than 2-3 units a day for women and 3-4 for men. Avoid binge drinking and if you do, avoid alcohol for the following 48 hours.  Alcohol is also high in calories and even a small amount can increase your appetite and so can be linked to weight gain. 


For more information visit:

The British Heart Foundation
The Stroke Association
Diabetes UK


Jo Lewin holds a degree in nutritional therapy and works as a community health nutritionist and private consultant. She is an accredited member of BANT, covered by the association's code of ethics and practice.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact  your local health care provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

 

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