Cashew caramels

Cashew caramels

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(1 ratings)

Prep: 10 mins Cook: 25 mins plus 3-4 hrs setting

More effort

Makes 35-40
These delicious homemade sweets, with toasted cashews and vanilla bean paste, make a great party nibble or edible gift

Nutrition and extra info

  • Gluten-free

Nutrition: per caramel (40)

  • kcal182
  • fat12g
  • saturates5g
  • carbs16g
  • sugars15g
  • fibre0g
  • protein2g
  • salt0.1g
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Ingredients

  • 375g toasted cashews
    Cashew

    Cashew

    ka-shoo

    The seeds from the 'Cashew Apple' - a tree which bears bright orange fruit and is native…

  • 125g butter
    Butter

    Butter

    butt-err

    Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

  • 350ml double cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste
  • 400g golden caster sugar
  • 250ml golden syrup
    Golden syrup

    Golden syrup

    goal-dun sir-rup

    Golden syrup is a clear, sparkling, golden-amber coloured, sweet

  • sea salt, for sprinkling

Method

  1. Line a 20cm square tin with foil and rub generously with vegetable oil. Add half the cashews to the tin. In a saucepan, bring the butter, cream and vanilla to the boil, then remove from the heat.

  2. In a large heavy-based saucepan, heat the sugar and syrup on a medium-low heat until it reaches 155C on a sugar thermometer. Do not stir or the sugar will crystallise. Turn off the heat and very carefully add to the cream mixture. Stir together and heat again until it reaches 125C on the thermometer. Remove from the heat and pour in the remaining nuts. Quickly pour into the tin, sprinkle over the salt and leave to cool.

  3. When firm (after 3-4 hrs), cut into pieces –use a knife that has been dipped into boiling water. Wrap in baking parchment until ready to eat. Will keep for 2 weeks in an airtight tin.

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Comments, questions and tips

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Be the first to comment...We'd love to hear how you got on with this recipe. Did you like it? Would you recommend others give it a try?
n101
17th Dec, 2015
Is there any way to make this without a sugar thermometer?
goodfoodteam's picture
goodfoodteam
22nd Dec, 2015
The advantage with using a sugar thermometer is that you can get an accurate reading and then react quickly before the sugar goes too far and burns, but it is possible to make these without. Get out a couple of bowls of cold water. The first temperature of 155C is called the hard crack stage. When you think the mixture is ready, drop a little of the syrup into the water and it should set to hard threads that will break if you bend them. Once you add the cream to the mixture and it cools to 125C this is called the firm ball stage. This time, when you drop the mixture into the water it can be rolled into a ball that gives a little when firmly pressed. Good luck and if you are worried that the syrup might cook too much while you are testing it, very carefully draw the pan from the heat using oven gloves then return again if the mixture needs longer cooking.
partington3
5th Dec, 2015
Did anyone else find theirs came out much darker than the picture? Has my sugar caramelised? It's very sticky too :-/
goodfoodteam's picture
goodfoodteam
14th Dec, 2015
Yes, it sounds like you may have heated the sugar a little too long as this would definitely give the caramels a darker colour.
Nicole Richards's picture
Nicole Richards
26th Nov, 2015
I would really want to make this but my sister is allergic to nuts. What can I replace the nuts by?
fanmail
4th Dec, 2015
Leave 'em out! Or when you have put it in the tin sprinkle with choc chips. Should be warm enough to stick them but I would think if you tried to mix them in they would just melt and it would not look pretty! Or cake sprinkles might look pretty, or glitter...
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