Best flour shakers – on test

We called upon Great British Bake Off stars Edd Kimber, John Whaite and Frances Quinn to review flour shakers. Discover their top buys and what you should look for when shopping...

Best design

Mary Berry for Lakeland shaker on a white backgroundMary Berry for Lakeland flour sifter, £3.29

This thrifty sifter has the added bonus of having transparent sides, so you can not only tell what’s in it but also keep track of the amount. The mesh is extra-fine, making it more suitable for dusting icing sugar than heavier bread flour, plus the handle is dinky enough to be slotted into a nook in a busy cupboard. Buy from Lakeland.


Best sturdiness

Borough Kitchen flour shaker

Borough Kitchen stainless steel mesh shaker, £10

This basic model is a classic dredger design, and while it's super-basic aesthetically speaking, every element of the shaker is strong and high quality. It has a high-grade gauze lid that screws on tightly and a pleasing, well-sized shape, which feels nice in the hand. Buy from Borough Kitchen.


Best aesthetic

M&S grater on white backgroundM&S stainless steel shaker, £7.50

Another stainless steel vessel, this dredger has an attractive, high-polish shine. The top is made from punched metal rather than a gauze or sieve material, so it’s more suited to filling with strong flour for bread, or ingredients that don't requite a dainty, fine dusting. Buy from M&S.

Buyer's advice

Flour shakers lined up to be tested


Why buy?

While we often like to get stuck into flouring surfaces with our bare hands, a flour dredger with a sieve or punched metal lid ensures an even dusting of flour and better control of ingredients than a traditional sieve, plus they also act as small storage vessels. As well as flour, they can be used for dusting cocoa, icing sugar or spices, which is handy when you need to finish off a bake with a nice neat, fine layer.

What should I buy?

The most important thing to look for is a shaker with an ultra-fine sieve, although chunkier metal shakers with larger round holes are fine to use when roughly dusting surfaces for kneading bread dough, for example. If you’re pressed for cupboard space, you might want to choose one without a handle. A see-through design allows you to monitor levels of powder, or indeed what the powder is – you don’t want to end up dusting your finished cake with flour after all...

What did we look for?

Edd Kimber and John Whaite testing flour shakersA quality sieve: For the purposes of a flour shaker doubling up for use as an icing sugar duster, you should buy a shaker with a super-fine gauze, but those with sturdy metal tops are good for bread-making.
Easy to clean: It’s important to keep the sieve clean, so we looked for tops that scrub up easily.
No waste: We looked for a shaker that didn’t lose too much of the ingredient inside.
A secure lid: As you're constantly tipping the shaker upside down, it's essential the lid screws on tightly. 
A compact cylinder: All three bakers preferred a small, compact shaker to models with handles as they require more storage space.

More reviews from Great British Bake Off bakers... 

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The best rolling pins
The best pastry brushes
The best icing turntables
The best marble rolling pins
The best measuring sets
The best piping bags
The best cooling racks
The best baking sheets

This review was last updated in June 2017. If you have any questions, suggestions for future reviews or spot anything that has changed in price or availability please get in touch at goodfoodwebsite@bbc.com. 

For more product rundowns, visit our review section. For more flour power, visit our baking page

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