Tomato Passata.
Member recipe

Tomato Passata.

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(5 ratings)

Member recipe by

Servings

Serves 4

Make this delicious Italian passata from your fully ripened garden tomatoes, fresh basil, garlic and red onion. Good for meat, fish and pasta recipes.

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Ingredients

  • 15 Fully ripened medium to large tomatoes, halved.
  • 1 Large, finely chopped red onion.
  • 2 tbls Olive oil.
  • 4 Pealed and chopped cloves of garlic.
  • 1 tbls Finely chopped basil.
  • 1 Desert sp Sundried tomato paste.
  • 1 Desert sp Tomato puree.
  • 1 tsp Course ground black pepper.
  • Salt to taste.
  • Makes approximately 1 ltr.

Method

    1. Place the tomatoes, garlic, basil and black pepper into a blender and liquidise.
    2. Using a large frying pan gently fry the red onion in the olive oil until just golden. Add to blender and liquidise.
    3. Pour the blender contents into your large pan and bring to the boil. Add the sun dried tomato paste and tomato puree and thoroughly mix. Now gently simmer, stirring frequently for 10 - 15 minutes and reduce until you have the perfect passata.

Comments, questions and tips

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viicmo
17th Aug, 2014
5.05
Great taste but "peals" of laughter that Editor cannot spell!
chromatopelma
22nd May, 2014
Love this recipe. Since having my first child, I like to cook sauces from scratch to control salt/sugar etc. very easy recipe. As someone else said, I don't bother finely chopping the ingredients first. Just stick them all in the pan and blend. Makes life much easier.
kirstenskeuken
1st Sep, 2013
This is a quick and easy recipe. I add fresh chilli and Worcestershire sauce. Like Gail my tomatoes vary in size. Play around with the ingredients and taste, taste, taste.
gail-jones's picture
gail-jones
5th Aug, 2013
Made this today with glut of greenhouse tomatoes. Don't know why one would painstakingly chop the garlic and basil first - I banged them whole into the blender and blitzed before the tomatoes which did the job a lot faster than chopping by hand. Great recipe though my tomatoes varied in size (and colour) from 'medium' to 'cherry' and from 'tiger' to 'golden', so kept going until I felt it was right. Used as a base for lasagne so ended up adding splash balsamic vinegar, red wine and a few other bits and pieces. Fresh tomatoes make a world of difference to this and it has a delicious sweet undertone from the cherry toms.
reetowdgit
22nd May, 2013
tinned tomatos works as well, out of season homegrown of course..
sylvia137
7th Oct, 2012
5.05
An excellent use of a glut of tomatoes, I added red pepper and oregano instead of basil, that also worked. It freezes well too.
kazziepoo40
26th Jan, 2012
This is a wholesome and tasty passata and I use it in any italian recipe I can - totally delicious!!!
choc_o_holic
6th Jan, 2012
5.05
Delicious!!!
lemon_farmer's picture
lemon_farmer
24th Oct, 2011
5.05
Excellent use of a glut, then used it to make sticky ribs, pasta with chorizo, all sorts. Will certainly make again, thank you.
Gompy
15th Jul, 2014
What is a good way of storing the passata? Prefer not to use freezing.
cinemike's picture
cinemike
26th Sep, 2013
I find that trying to reduce passata quickly can lead to burning. So 15 minutes isn't sufficient to reduce the passata to anything very different from tomato pulp. My solution is to use a slow cooker and a microwave - the microwave to bring the pulp to boiling point (about 10 minutes per litre on full power) - then transfer this to a previously warmed (with hot water) slow cooker. 2 hours per litre on full power followed by 3 hours per litre on low both removes most of the liquid and breaks down the pulp tissues leaving a very smooth result. Obviously the amount is less - only about 50% by volume, but the taste is much richer. Finally 'salt to taste' is mentioned. It cannot be emphasised too much that one must await the reduction before adding the 'salt to taste' as a 50% reduction would result in a doubling of the concentration of salt in the resulting passata.