Baked ham with brown sugar & mustard glaze

Baked ham with brown sugar & mustard glaze

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(5 ratings)

Prep: 15 mins Cook: 3 hrs, 30 mins Plus soaking

Easy

Serves 12
Served hot or cold, this delicious cut of pork with a sugar glaze is best sliced into thick pieces

Nutrition and extra info

  • Freeze leftovers, sliced

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal337
  • fat19g
  • saturates7g
  • carbs8g
  • sugars8g
  • fibre0g
  • protein35g
  • salt4.02g
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Ingredients

  • 4-5kg/9-11lb raw smoked ham on the bone
  • 90g/3oz soft brown sugar
  • 6 tbsp wholegrain mustard
  • dark rye bread, sweet sliced pickles and bay leaves, to serve

Method

  1. Place the raw ham in a large, clean bucket. Add enough water to cover and soak overnight, or up to 24 hrs ahead, changing the water twice.

  2. Heat oven to 180C/160C fan/gas 4. Drain and place the ham in a large roasting tin, cover tightly with foil and bake for 3 hrs.

  3. Remove the ham from the oven and turn the heat up to 200C/180C fan/gas 6.Using a sharp knife, carefully slice the rind off the ham, leaving about 1-2 cm of fat; cut a diamond-shaped pattern into this. In a small bowl, mix together the sugar and mustard, then rub all over the ham. Roast for 30 mins until the ham is tender and the outside nice and sticky.

  4. Bring to the table on a large platter lined with bay leaves. To serve, cut 1cm-thick slices off the ham to go alongside the rye bread, pickles and mustard sauce (Make your own sauce with our recipe below).

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Comments, questions and tips

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bakingnut
26th Dec, 2016
5.05
Totally fabulous. Had 3kg to cook was unsure how I had previously cooked so soaked meat overnight then made this today. Used English mustard powder and honey. Initially roasted in tight fitting pot, poured half carton orange juice, large organge zested by peeling off large slices, quartering then putting in whole lot. Added some star anise and two large cinnamon sticks broken up. After roasting coated skin, butcher had scored into diamonds prior which was a massive help, with mustard honey paste. The end result was divine. Thanks to the original poster and the name did not need boiling at all which saved time and energy. I will be slicing and freezing as iworked very well last year.
kerrie29
27th May, 2012
5.05
This is divine, I have cooked gammon and bacon joints so many times over the years but this is simply the best recipe, everybody comments on how lovely it is.
1edithbower
28th Dec, 2011
I've done a similar recipe for many years. I do boil the ham first, then I use an english mustard powder and brown sugar, just patting it on the the fat before putting it in the oven for the last half hour.
saphhire
24th Dec, 2011
4.05
Haven't tried this particular recipe but it sounds good. I baked my ham this year for the first time without boiling it first and it was delish. I should have bought a larger piece, as half of it has gone already. Also I baked it in a lidded casserole - (Judge manufacture). The dimples in the lid let the moisture drop down onto the joint and keep it moist. Saves on silver foil!!
smurfmurf
21st Dec, 2011
I ALWAYS boil my ham first but may be an Irish thing will you let me know how you get on Theresa???
teresal
21st Dec, 2011
Hi Scot01. I always roast my ham without boiling and no disasters (or complaints) yet.
scot01
19th Dec, 2011
I am trying this tonight however am slightly worried that it doesn't include any boiling which every other recipe seems to! Does the bake in tin foil do as good a job? Thanks
campbellcutie
23rd Dec, 2016
Anyone know how you might change the timings of this if you had a boneless not a boned joint? And change the weight and still be enough for 12 people?
goodfoodteam's picture
goodfoodteam
24th Dec, 2016
Thanks for your question. We have a feature on how to cook ham which will help you work out the cooking times according to the weight you buy. You'll find it here.
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