Top 5 juicers and smoothie makers

  • By
    Roxanne Fisher - Health editor - bbcgoodfood.com

Convenience, size and cleaning ease are often key considerations when choosing a juicer or smoothie maker. We tested five popular versions to suit varying budgets and needs...

Top 5 juicers and smoothie makers

If you’ve been caught up in the green juice boom sweeping the nation, it’s likely you’ve thought about buying a juicer, or at least glanced over a few blenders and smoothie makers if you’re partial to a bulkier beverage.

With so many options on the market there really is something for every need and budget, with convenience and cleaning ease being key considerations if you’re going to get your good intentions to stick. We put five popular models to the test to help you find the right bit of kit for you…

 

NutribulletNutribullet

Technically not a juicer, not a blender but an extractor, the Nutribullet is seriously compact, taking up little more surface space than a teacup. It comes with three cups, with sizes for individual or double portions, plus includes handles and lids for a portable blend. 

The two easily interchangeable blades meant we were able to blitz nuts and seeds as easily as fruit and vegetables to create a completely smooth ‘Nutriblast’ in seconds. Our first attempt came out a little thick so remember to add at least half a cup of liquid for a good consistency - we liked a splash of coconut milk for added hydration.

This was by far the easiest appliance to clean and is completely fuss-free. The blades attach directly to the cup and you simply twist off after use and rinse under warm water. As useful to make quick, delicious drinks as it is to blitz baby food.

£99.99, robertdyas.co.uk

 

Philips Avance Collection Juicer HR1871/00Philips

You’ll have to commit a fair bit of surface space to this heavy-duty juicer, though its imposing size belied the ease with which we got it up and running. With some serious power behind it, the Avance made short work of whole, unpeeled apples, carrots and other non-starchy fruit and veg, and the easily removable parts are dishwasher safe and made cleaning quick and simple.

Until you get the hang of it, the juicer can be a little overzealous with smaller, softer fruits such as berries, and we found a fair bit ended up in the pulp container. However, with two speed settings and a little practice, this is an effective bit of kit and has long been the go-to machine for juicing converts.

£199.99, from Argos.co.uk

 

Kenwood ‘Smoothies To Go’ SB055 Silver BlenderKenwood

This compact blender is designed to be quick and powerful. It differs from an all-purpose blender as the mixing jug can be turned into a handy travel mug thanks so a dispensing lid.

Two mugs are included, with markings allowing you to mix ingredients of your choice. Our smoothies still had some texture but were well mixed. Easy to clean and store too.

£24, Debenhams.com

 

SageSage Nutri Juicer Pro

In ultra-robust, die-cast metal, this juicer works really quickly, extracting an average of 70% of nutrients from fruit. Because it’s so zippy, the machine stays cool, which is very important for protecting and retaining all the goodness. It really does squeeze out every drop. It also comes with the weird sounding ‘Froojie’ disc that enables maximum yield from soft fruit like strawberries.

With five speed settings, this is a serious piece of equipment for the juicing addict.

£300, houseoffraser.co.uk

 

Magimix Le Duo Plus XL Juice Extractor, Black SatinMagimix

This isn’t new but it remains one of the best we’ve tested. It has a very small footprint, which means it won’t clutter up the worksurface, and it comes with a citrus press and smoothie/coulis maker.

The cleverly placed spout means you can pour fresh, nutritious juice straight into your glass, getting your day off to a healthy start. It's also easy to clean as all removable parts are dishwasher safe.

£199.95, Johnlewis.com


Do you have a favourite juicer or smoothie maker? We'd love to hear your recommendations...

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debonopatricia's picture

The juicers you suggested are centrifuge juicers which discard around 75% of the vitamins with the pulp. Musticating juicers are said to be the best as they retain most of the vitamins in the juice.Granted, they are quite expensive, but some might think they're worth the expense.

Pat Debono Malta

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