Glossary

Gelatine

Gelatine

Pronounce it: jell-ah-teen

A colourless, tasteless and odourless setting agent made from the boiled bones, skins and tendons of animals. When dissolved in boiling water and then cooled it turns into a jelly-like form that is used to thicken and stabilise desserts such as jelly, custard and fillings.

Gelatine comes in either leaf or powdered form. Powdered gelatine in available in most supermarkets, usually with instructions on how much is need to set a specific quantity of liquid. Most cooks, however, prefer to use leaf gelatine as it dissolves quickly and is odourless, flavourless and clear.

Prepare it

To dissolve gelatine leaves soak them in cold water for five minutes and then remove and squeeze out the leaves.

To prepare powdered gelatine sprinkle it into cold water until it swells and then stirred into hot liquid to dissolve.

Store it

In a cool dark place.

Cook it

In desserts or cold soups.

Alternatives

Try agar-agar.

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