Boiled beef & carrots with parsley dumplings

Boiled beef & carrots with parsley dumplings

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(1 ratings)

Ready in 2¾ hours

More effort

Serves 6
Gordon Ramsay revives a British stalwart, boiled beef and dumplings, with a few modern twists

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition:

  • kcal-
  • fat-
  • saturates-
  • carbs-
  • sugars-
  • fibre-
  • protein-
  • salt-
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Ingredients

  • 1-1¼kg joint silverside beef
    Beef

    Beef

    bee-f

    The classic cut of meat for a British Sunday roast, beef is full of flavour, as well as being a…

  • 2l good quality stock (chicken, beef or vegetable)

Vegetables for the stock

  • 2 carrot
    Carrot

    Carrot

    ka-rot

    The carrot, with its distinctive bright orange colour, is one of the most versatile root…

  • 1 leek
    Leeks

    Leek

    lee-k

    Like garlic and onion, leeks are a member of the allium family, but have their own distinct…

  • 1 onion
    Onion

    Onion

    un-yun

    Onions are endlessly versatile and an essential ingredient in countless recipes. Native to Asia…

  • 2-3 turnip
    Turnips

    Turnip

    tern-ip

    Turnips are creamy-white with a lovely purple, red or greenish upper part where the taproot has…

  • ½ small celeriac
    Celeriac

    Celeriac

    sell-air-e-ak

    The unsung hero of the vegetable world, knobbly, odd-shaped celeriac has a subtle, celery-like…

  • few sprigs of fresh thyme and 2-3 bay leaves

    Thyme

    This popular herb grows in Europe, especially the Mediterranean, and is a member of the mint…

For the spice bag

  • 4-5 star anise
    Star anise

    Star anise

    star an-eese

    Star anise is one of the central spices in Chinese cooking. It has a strong anise flavour, with…

  • 4-5 cardamom pods
  • 4-5 cloves
    Cloves

    Clove

    klo-ve

    The dry, unopened flower bud of the tropical myrtle tree family used to flavour a wide variety…

  • 1 tsp coriander seed
    Coriander seeds

    Coriander seed

    kor-ee-and-er seed

    The small, creamy brown seeds of the coriander plant give dishes a warm, aromatic and slightly…

  • ½ tsp peppercorns

For the baby vegetables

  • ½ small celeriac
    Celeriac

    Celeriac

    sell-air-e-ak

    The unsung hero of the vegetable world, knobbly, odd-shaped celeriac has a subtle, celery-like…

  • 12 baby turnip
    Turnips

    Turnip

    tern-ip

    Turnips are creamy-white with a lovely purple, red or greenish upper part where the taproot has…

  • 18 baby carrot
  • 12 baby leek
    Leeks

    Leek

    lee-k

    Like garlic and onion, leeks are a member of the allium family, but have their own distinct…

For the dumplings

  • 250g self-raising flour
  • 125g shredded suet
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 3 rounded tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
    Parsley

    Parsley

    par-slee

    One of the most ubiquitous herbs in British cookery, parsley is also popular in European and…

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
    olive oil

    Olive oil

    ol-iv oyl

    Probably the most widely-used oil in cooking, olive oil is pressed from fresh olives. It's…

  • 4-5 star anise, peppercorns and thyme sprigs
    Star anise

    Star anise

    star an-eese

    Star anise is one of the central spices in Chinese cooking. It has a strong anise flavour, with…

Method

  1. Cut the beef into three or four chunky pieces, put in a large pan and just cover with cold water. Bring it quickly to the boil, then reduce to a simmer and, using a ladle, skim off any scum on the top. As you are doing this, you will also be removing some of the water. Pour in the stock, return it to the boil, then turn to a simmer.

  2. Meanwhile, roughly chop the vegetables and add them to the pan with the sprigs of thyme and bay leaves. Season lightly.

  3. Take a large square of muslin (or use a clean J-cloth), lay the spices in the middle and then tie up with kitchen string, like a money bag. Drop the bag into the pan and tie the bag to the handle. Simmer the beef (don’t let it boil) for about 2 hrs, until the meat feels tender when pierced with a sharp knife. If the stock reduces down too much, top it up with more water so the meat remains submerged.

  4. While the beef is cooking, peel celeriac and cut into small sticks about 1cm thick. Halve turnips. Trim tops off the other vegetables, but don’t peel – there’s no need. Bring a pan of lightly salted water to the boil and blanch vegetables for about 3 mins. Have ready a large bowl of ice-cold water and when the vegetables are just tender, drain them and tip immediately into the water. Leave for 2-3 mins, drain again and set aside. Also, while the beef is cooking, mix together the flour, suet, salt, a grinding of pepper and the parsley for the dumplings.

  5. When the beef is cooked, remove the pan from the heat, then strain off and reserve the stock for cooking the dumplings and reheating the baby vegetables (you won’t use it all). Discard the vegetables and tip the beef into a baking dish. Cover loosely with foil to keep warm.

  6. Mix just enough cold water (about 200ml) into the flour and suet mix to make a soft dough. If the dough is too wet, it will be difficult to shape. Roll gently into 10-12 balls. Bring a shallow pan of water to the boil and add a couple of ladles of the stock plus the olive oil, the star anise, peppercorns and thyme sprigs. Using a slotted spoon, lower in the dumplings. Cover and simmer for about 12-15 mins, until risen and fluffy. Remove the dumplings with a slotted spoon.

  7. Spoon about three ladles of stock into another pan, bring to a simmer and reheat the veg briefly. Remove with a slotted spoon. Strain the stock from the veg for serving.

  8. Cut each beef chunk into slices and season lightly. Arrange in warmed serving dishes with the baby vegetables, celeriac and dumplings. Pour some stock over and serve.

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Comments, questions and tips

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copine
5th Jan, 2012
Excellent - I used salt beef (soaked for couple of hours prior to cooking), spices give wonderful flavour (J-cloth method works fine) and used good veg in the stock. Watch out for amount of water and cooking time with dumplings as they can go a bit gooey. Did this for New Year's dinner party and it went down a treat.
dhhmjc
31st May, 2011
5.05
Excellent and easy but a lot depends on the quality of the stock, as ever.
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