Ultimate chocolate cake

Ultimate chocolate cake

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(909 ratings)

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Cooking time

Prep: 30 mins - 40 mins Cook: 1 hr - 1 hr, 30 mins Plus baking and cooling time

Skill level

Easy

Servings

Cuts into 14 slices

Indulge yourself with Angela Nilsen's heavenly moist and fudgy chocolate cake - perfect for celebrations - birthdays, weddings, christenings - any excuse!

Nutrition and extra info

Additional info

  • Without icing
Nutrition info

Nutrition

kcalories
541
protein
6g
carbs
55g
fat
35g
saturates
20g
fibre
2g
sugar
40g
salt
0.51g
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Ingredients

  • 200g good quality dark chocolate, about 60% cocoa solids
  • 200g butter
  • 1 tbsp instant coffee granules
  • 85g self-raising flour
  • 85g plain flour
  • ¼ tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 200g light muscovado sugar
  • 200g golden caster sugar
  • 25g cocoa powder
  • 3 medium eggs
  • 75ml buttermilk (5 tbsp)
  • grated chocolate or curls, to decorate

For the ganache

  • 200g good quality dark chocolate, as above
  • 284ml carton double cream (pouring type)
  • 2 tbsp golden caster sugar

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Method

  1. Butter a 20cm round cake tin (7.5cm deep) and line the base. Preheat the oven to fan 140C/conventional 160C/ gas 3. Break 200g good quality dark chocolate in pieces into a medium, heavy-based pan. Cut 200g butter into pieces and tip in with the chocolate, then mix 1 tbsp instant coffee granules into 125ml cold water and pour into the pan. Warm through over a low heat just until everything is melted – don’t overheat. Or melt in the microwave on Medium for about 5 minutes, stirring half way through.
  2. While the chocolate is melting, mix 85g self-raising flour, 85g plain flour, ¼ bicarbonate of soda, 200g light muscovado sugar, 200g golden caster sugar and 25g cocoa powder in a big bowl, mixing with your hands to get rid of any lumps. Beat 3 medium eggs in a bowl and stir in 75ml (5 tbsp) buttermilk.
  3. Now pour the melted chocolate mixture and the egg mixture into the flour mixture, stirring just until everything is well blended and you have a smooth, quite runny consistency. Pour this into the tin and bake for 1 hour 25- 1 hour 30 minutes – if you push a skewer in the centre it should come out clean and the top should feel firm (don’t worry if it cracks a bit). Leave to cool in the tin (don’t worry if it dips slightly), then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  4. When the cake is cold, cut it horizontally into three. Make the ganache: chop 200g good quality dark chocolate into small pieces and tip into a bowl. Pour a 284ml carton of double cream into a pan, add 2 tbsp golden caster sugar, and heat until it is about to boil. Take off the heat and pour it over the chocolate. Stir until the chocolate has melted and the mixture is smooth.
  5. Sandwich the layers together with just a little of the ganache. Pour the rest over the cake letting it fall down the sides and smoothing to cover with a palette knife. Decorate with grated chocolate or a pile of chocolate curls. The cake keeps moist and gooey for 3-4 days.

Recipe from Good Food magazine, April 2004

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Comments

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pollydar's picture

Please help me. My cakes always bake much more quickly than the recipe states. This one included. If I leave it in longer than 30 it burns. Also it doesn't rise. I follow the recipe exactly. Could it be my oven, my gas supply, or the tin I bake it in? Any advice would be gratefully received.

megaz123's picture

Are you at altitude or sea level this can adjust the cooking time a lot. Also humidity is a factor.

chris220883's picture

This is an amazing recipe, really easy to make as well. Couple of things: 1) make it in 2 tins and reduce the cooking time to about 50mins. This is much easier than trying to cut it. 2) with the ganache, make it as described but leave it to cool as it firms up nicely and makes it easy to work with. I think I left mine in the fridge for about 2 hours, kept stirring it though. Also, instead of chocolate shavings on the top raspberries work exceedingly well and help cut through the richness of the cake. To serve, I liked mine cold out of the fridge but my mum and sis liked theirs walked up in the microwave. Either way it's amazing!

hanah.hd's picture
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I tried this recipe for my father's birthday and it turned out really well. It was my first time to bake a cake and I have no regrets. The only thing that I found difficult was slicing the cake into three portions. I thought that the height was not high enough to make into three layers. I ended up slicing it in two.

sroberts134's picture
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Completely have to disagree with the comment below, I've made this twice now and it comes out wonderfully! like a couple of others have commented I've divided the mixture into two tins rather than cut it into three as the recipe suggests. I also used apricot jam in addition to the ganache to add a soft citrus touch.

sherlockanonymous's picture
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I attempted to use this recipe so I could make my best friend a birthday cake for her 16th. I did not have self raising flour so I just used plain flour and did not alter any of the other ingredients. However when it had been in the oven for approximately an hour and i went to check on it, it had bubbled over the cake tin I used even though it was bigger than it specified. I can't imagine would would of happened had I used self raising flour. And in the end I had to disappoint one of my oldest friends because of a recipe gone wrong. There was clearly something wrong with the recipe but I do not care what it is nor do I care to find out, as next time I will be finding a different recipe.

megaz123's picture

You can't really blame the recipe when you replace self raising flour with plain flour. It sounds like it was your silly fault not following the ingredients. Can't be a very good friend if you couldn't be bothered to pop to the shops to buy self raising flour. This is not what this website is about.

danimpaul's picture

It sunk and tastes too much like coffee, not impressed

beetaylor's picture

I have made this cake A LOT. Mainly because once I made it for work, I was never allowed to make another cake again. That said, if you don't get the ganache right it's too runny. I have found reducing the amount of cream works, as well as putting it in the fridge before icing. It's hard not to break the cake though, so I've never fully achieve a split level unless baking it in two seperate trays.

missburns's picture
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If you whisk the mixture once cooled that will get some air into it and you'll find it won't be as runny. I would still leave it in the fridge overnight though.

Anitayakkundi's picture

Love this recipe! I was very vary of making a chocolate cake as they cab be dry if you don't get it right. With this recipe I was able to get the perfect moist rich chocolate cake that my whole family enjoyed. This is now added to my favourites. I hope it works as well each time.

Floral_One's picture
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I thought I liked chocolate and had a sweet tooth - but this cake is really intense! After I cut it into two the top broke into multiple pieces, and the chocolate ganache (which I had never made before) literally poured off the cake. It was left looking like a bit of a chocolate bomb site. I'm glad that it was just for the immediate family as it is probably the least successful (looks wise) cake that I have ever made!

Floral_One's picture
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Just thought I'd add that after a good nights rest I came back to the cake the next day to find that the ganache which had managed to stay on the cake had now set nicely, and that the flavour of the cake if anything had improved. We ended up devouring the lot - would def make this a day before it is needed to give time for the topping to set, and let the ganache cool a bit first before putting it on to the cake.

Just made the cake a 2nd time - I left the ganache to cool and thicken for about 3-4 hours before putting it on the cake - what a difference!

Now got my 3rd choc cake in the oven (this recipe is bad for my waistline!) - this time it isn't easter or a family birthday - we just 'needed' choc cake! It has now become a fave recipe. I love that you don't need an electric mixer. Just sieve the dry ingredients into the mixing bowl and then when you come to stir in the wet ingredients they mix in really easily with no lumps. Also don't try to cut the cake until it has cooled as this will make it a bit easier - no way I'd cut it into 3. Half is tricky enough. Enjoy!!

missburns's picture
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This cake still tastes great with half the amount of sugar, if you find it too sweet. If you bake it in 2 tins instead of one you won't need to cut it in half. Or you could double the flour quantity of each (plain and self raising) which works really well. It's much easier to cut and still tastes fab. Also, for the ganache I whisk it once cooled and then leave it in the fridge overnight. The consistency will be much thicker then.

missburns's picture
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This cake works just as well using cadbury's chocolate. I've also used this recipe and made it into muffins. Don't fill the cases more than 3/4 full as they will overflow. I baked them at 140c for 50 mins. Don't check before 40 mins otherwise they will sink. These turned out delicious! The texture is like a really soft brownie (not gooey, just right!) and the top is lovely and chewy. No need for a ganache topping as it's perfect as it is! I think this is the best chocolate cake I've ever come across. If you want a more spongey texture then put 200g of self-raising flour and 200g of plain flour in instead of 85g of each. Only tried this in a cake tin but it turned out to be a real winner.

flower1234's picture
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This recipe is gorgeous! It came together really easily, and didn't sink at all. Next time I make it I will put a bit of foil on top to stop it getting crust; but saying that I turned it upside down and covered it in chocolate buttercream and icing and it got eaten in a flash.

andriaph's picture

I've made this cake several times and it different sizes but multiplying the ingredients. it's a foolproof recipe which has amazing results each time. A highly recommended cake for chocolate lovers.

loungeflygirl's picture

I have made this cake twice now and am preparing to make it again for a charity bake sale. It is the best chocolate cake I have ever tried, really rich, fudgey and soft. I just did a filling of whipped double cream with some salted caramel sauce folded/dolloped through it and also used good coffee and 80% Lindt dark chocolate in the cake - it was outstanding! Like other comments I divided the mix between two sandwich tins instead. I then sliced them in half to make four layers which made it look quite grand when finished. I received a lot of compliments from friends and colleagues. Re erandanee's comment: I've found soft light brown sugar to be a good sub for muscovado in other recipes and either ordinary or golden caster sugar produce the same results for me too, so would have thought they are inter-changeable depending what you have in. Hope that helps.

erandanee's picture

Please tell me a Substitute for light muscovado sugar. Can I use raw brown sugar instead of light muscovado sugar? I live in New Zealand and cannot find this light muscovado sugar. Also we do not have Golden caster sugar. Can I use just normal caster sugar? Please answer me.....

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