Strawberry-mallow cheesecake

Strawberry-mallow cheesecake

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(6 ratings)

Prep: 40 mins Cook: 25 mins - 30 mins Plus chilling

More effort

Cuts into 12 slices
Fruit eases the guilt factor of this pretty-in-pink, ricotta-based cake with a shortbread base and marshmallow topping

Nutrition and extra info

  • Freezable

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal523
  • fat28g
  • saturates18g
  • carbs60g
  • sugars43g
  • fibre1g
  • protein7g
  • salt0.3g
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Ingredients

  • 7 sheets leaf gelatine
  • 500g strawberry, plus a few extra small ones, halved, to serve

    Strawberry

    straw-bare-ee

    Once available in Britain for just a brief period during the summer, strawberries are now a year…

  • 100ml milk

    Milk

    mill-k

    One of the most widely used ingredients, milk is often referred to as a complete food. While cow…

  • 250g tub ricotta

    Ricotta

    ree-cot-a

    Ricotta is an Italian curd cheese. Made from whey, it is traditionally a by-product of making…

  • 140g caster sugar
  • 300ml double cream
  • 200g bag pink and white marshmallow, snipped into quarters or use mini ones
  • icing sugar, for dusting

For the shortbread base

  • 175g cold butter, chopped

    Butter

    butt-err

    Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

  • 200g plain flour
  • 85g caster sugar
  • little sunflower oil, for the tin

    Sunflower oil

    A variety of oils can be used for baking. Sunflower is the one we use most often at Good Food as…

Method

  1. First, make the shortbread base. Heat oven to 160C/140C fan/gas 3. Rub the butter into the flour and sugar until the mixture makes a sticky dough. You can do this by hand or in a food processor. Press evenly into the base of a non-stick 26cm springform tin and smooth with the back of a metal spoon. Prick all over with a fork, then bake for 25-30 mins until pale golden. Cool, then carefully oil the sides of the tin using kitchen paper.

  2. To make the filling, soak the gelatine in cold water for a few mins to soften. Meanwhile, purée the strawberries in a food processor or with a hand blender until very smooth, then rub through a sieve to remove all the seeds. Pour the milk into a small pan and warm gently. Squeeze the gelatine of excess water, add to the milk, then remove from the heat and stir to dissolve. Cool.

  3. Stir the strawberry purée, gelatine mixture, ricotta and sugar together until smooth. In a separate bowl, whisk the cream until it softly holds its shape, then fold into the strawberry mixture with three-quarters of the marshmallows.

  4. Carefully pour onto the cooled base and scatter over the remaining marshmallows. Cover the tin with cling film and chill until firm, preferably overnight. Cheesecake can be made 2 days ahead if kept chilled.

  5. Carefully remove the cheesecake from the tin. Decorate with extra berries and finish with a dusting of icing sugar.

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Comments, questions and tips

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Comments (8)

christinathebaker's picture
0

I found this recipe in the Good Food 2012 July addition and i thought it would be brilliant to make for a birthday meal in the summer. After clearing out the marshmallows in the supermarket, I followed the recipe. When it came to adding the marshmallows to the mixture I added 300g (as the magazine told me to take away 1/4 for the topping, WHICH I DIDN'T NEED!!) When the cheesecake was ready to go into the fridge I could see something just wasn't right... THERE WERE TOO MANY MARSHMALLOWS!!!!!!

Overall I was very disappointed with this recipe and I will be ripping the page out of the book and will be putting it into the bin along with the marshmallows for the topping.

elizabethruthjenkins@gmail.com's picture
1.25

I wouldn't make this again, the base was too thick and the cheesecake wasn't very much like a classic cheesecake, it tasted more like a blancmange. Sounded lovely to make but disappointing to eat.

chloeducks's picture

I found the base cut perfectly although the topping was bland and not at all strawberry as well as the marshmallows went too soggy. Had a lovely soft texture though and if you used a stronger fruit such as a raspberry it would have a much nicer taste and I would make it again by doing this.

libby0's picture
3

I read the previous comments and decided to make a digestive biscuit / butter base which worked well.

I didn't sieve the strawberries either, that was fine. I used mini-marshmallows. In the magazine version it said 400g!!! but 175g bag was way more than you needed.

This is the most beautiful looking cheesecake I have ever made, it has the proper WOW factor but unfortunately the taste is not worth the calories. Marshmallow looks beautiful but add no taste. Too much gelatine gave it an over-set texture. It needs a stronger strawberry taste.

joannehelen's picture
4

Just made this for the second time. No need to sieve the strawberries, the seeds aren't noticeable at all and you don't lose half the purée on the sieve! This time I used mini marshmallows which was more successful than cutting up big ones. I love this cheesecake, the texture is almost mousse like and as long as you don't overlook the base it is easy to slice.

jillholroyd's picture
1

This was one of the most disappointing recipes I've ever made - I still can't believe that the leftover third of it went in the bin! Basically tasted of gelatine and very little else.

heatherkeen's picture

I found that the marsh mallows went all soggy which wasn't nice and the base too hard! The strawberry cheese element was nice. If I did it again I'd make a shortbread/ butter base , and sprinkle on the marsh mallow to decorate before serving. I wouldn't mix them in!

eleanormayo's picture
2

Remarkably disappointing - the baked base made it really hard to cut and the taste was just too sweet - the sweetness just overwhelmed the taste of the strawberries.

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Tips (1)

christinathebaker's picture
0

If making this recipe use the online version NOT the magazine!!

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