Beef, ale & parsnip pudding

Beef, ale & parsnip pudding

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(5 ratings)

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Cooking time

Prep: 20 mins Cook: 3 hrs, 30 mins

Skill level

Moderately easy

Servings

Serves 4

A traditional steak and ale pie with suet pastry. Make the filling the night before then steam the pudding the following morning for a delicious Sunday lunch

Nutrition and extra info

Additional info

  • Freezable
Nutrition info

Nutrition per serving

kcalories
1072
protein
33g
carbs
86g
fat
62g
saturates
28g
fibre
7g
sugar
15g
salt
1.5g

Ingredients

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 100g smoked bacon lardons
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 500g lean stewing beef, cubed
  • 2 tbsp plain flour
  • 3 parsnips, cubed
  • 500ml brown ale
  • 300ml beef stock
  • 2 tbsp cranberry or redcurrant jelly
  • 4 thyme sprigs
  • greens, to serve (optional)

For the suet pastry

  • butter, for greasing
  • 300g self-raising flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 2 tsp English mustard powder
  • 140g shredded suet

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Method

  1. Heat a large pan and cook the onion and lardons together for 5 mins until golden. Scoop out with a slotted spoon and set aside. Add the oil to the pan, dust the beef with the flour, then evenly brown over a high heat.
  2. Add the parsnips, ale, stock, jelly, thyme and lardon mixture to the pan. Bring to the boil, then cover and simmer for 1½ hrs until the meat is tender.
  3. Generously butter a 1.5-litre pudding basin. To make the pastry, mix together the flour, mustard powder, suet and ½ tsp table salt. Add enough cold water, about 150ml, to make a soft dough. Remove one-quarter of the dough and set to one side. On a heavily floured surface, roll out the remaining dough to make a large round, big enough to line the basin.
  4. Carefully lay the pastry in the basin (aim to have 1cm of pastry overhanging the rim), then press the edges of the join together to seal. Roll out the remaining one-quarter into a circle big enough to cover the top.
  5. Pour off the cooking liquid from the filling into a small pan and set aside. Discard the thyme stalks. Spoon the filling into the lined basin and pour over 100ml of the cooking liquid. Fold over the overhanging pastry and brush with water. Place the lid on top, pressing firmly around the edges to seal.
  6. Butter a sheet of baking parchment, fold in a large pleat and lay, butter-side down, on top of the pudding. Cover with a pleated layer of foil and finally tie with string, making a loop for the handle so you can lift the pudding easily.
  7. Sit a small trivet or a large cookie cutter in the bottom of a deep saucepan that’s big enough to take the basin easily. Half-fill the pan with water and bring to the boil. Lower in the pudding, cover and simmer for 2 hrs, topping up with boiling water when necessary.
  8. Reheat the cooking liquid, bubbling it down a little so it reduces into a tasty gravy. Carefully lift out the pudding. Run a knife around the rim, then turn out and serve with gravy and greens, if you like.

Recipe from Good Food magazine, March 2012

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Comments

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vrog's picture

Liked the way the sweetness of the jelly took away some of the bitterness of the ale. It was a good dinner to make on a very wet February day - 5 hours of good smells from the kitchen. At over 1000 calories per portion it's not for everyday though!

kimkap's picture
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Forgot to rate it. x

kimkap's picture
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We all thoroughly enjoyed this pudding although my husband has asked for carrots next time. Will let you all know how it turns out. Yummy

ktcooper's picture

This looks fab, but how long would you pressure cook it for please?

giblin_j's picture
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Wow, it was a while ago i made this now, but really amazing. Quite time consuming but well wirth it

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