Really useful roast chicken

Really useful roast chicken

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Cooking time

Prep: 5 mins Cook: 1 hr, 10 mins

Skill level

Easy

Servings

Serves 4

This succulent all-purpose roast can be enjoyed with trimmings on Sunday or used as the basis for other satisfying meals

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition info

Nutrition per serving

kcalories
434
protein
51g
carbs
1g
fat
25g
saturates
8g
fibre
0g
sugar
1g
salt
0.39g

Ingredients

  • medium whole chicken (about 1.6kg)
  • 1 lemon, halved
  • 1 onion, cut into wedges
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • few thyme or rosemary sprigs, or even a couple of bay leaves

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Method

  1. Heat oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6. Untie the legs and sit the chicken in a roasting tin, preferably non-stick. Push the lemon, half the onion and a few herb sprigs into the cavity. Re-tie the legs with string if you like. Turn the chicken over so the breast side is facing down, season generously, then drizzle with half the oil. Roast for 30 mins.
  2. Carefully turn the chicken over, add the remaining onion and a few more herb sprigs to the tin, then toss them with any juices. Season the breast side, then drizzle with remaining oil. Roast for 40 mins until deep golden and smelling irresistible. Test chicken is cooked by inserting a skewer into the thickest part of the thigh; the juices should run clear. If they don’t, give it 10 more mins, then check again. Cool for 30 mins, then use your hands to pull the meat from the bones in big pieces (this is far easier than when the chicken is cold, plus you can get it in the fridge more quickly to completely cool down). Chill for up to 3 days, or use the warm meat for one of my recipes (see below).

Recipe from Good Food magazine, August 2009

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Comments

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riesling's picture

Two Hoots: I think what was meant was that if the chicken is broken up while still warm, it will cool down more quickly and therefore can be placed in the fridge sooner.

twohoots's picture

Surely you don't mean to break the chicken up so that you can cool it in the fridge more quickly? Thats how it reads. You should never put warm food in the fridge.

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