Rabbit & pork terrine with peppercorns

Rabbit & pork terrine with peppercorns

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
(0 ratings)

Prep: 30 mins Cook: 2 hrs, 15 mins plus marinating, pressing and chilling

More effort

Serves 8 as a starter or lunch
This rich terrine, with thyme, allspice and brandy, can be pressed and mature overnight for a perfect make-ahead starter or light lunch

Nutrition and extra info

  • Freezable

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal406
  • fat25g
  • saturates10g
  • carbs1g
  • sugars1g
  • fibre1g
  • protein41g
  • salt1.5g
Save to My Good Food
Please sign in or register to save recipes.

Ingredients

  • meat from 3 wild rabbits, 500g brown meat from the back legs and trimmings, 200g from the loins
  • 500g boneless pork belly, cut into chunks
  • 25g butter
    Butter

    Butter

    butt-err

    Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

  • 2 garlic cloves, bruised
  • 3 shallots, finely chopped
    Shallot

    Shallot

    shal-lot

    Related to the onion (as opposed to being a younger version of it), shallots grow in clusters at…

  • a few thyme sprigs
  • good pinch of ground allspice
  • 1 tbsp green peppercorns in brine, drained
  • 3-4 tbsp brandy
    Brandy

    Brandy

    bran-dee

    Brandy is a distilled spirit made from virtually any fermented fruit or starchy vegetable.…

  • splash of vegetable oil
  • 16-20 rashers dry-cured streaky unsmoked bacon
    Bacon

    Bacon

    bay-kon

    Bacon is pork that has been cured one of two ways: dry or wet. It can be bought as both rashers…

  • about 100g/4oz small cornichons, plus extra to serve

Method

  1. Ask your butcher to remove the meat from the rabbit, or do it yourself. The leg meat can be as roughly prepped as you like, but keep the loins as neat as you can.

  2. Put the leg meat, trimmings and pork belly in a processor, finely chop, then tip into a large bowl. Melt the butter and cook the garlic, shallots and thyme together gently for 8 mins or until the shallots are soft but not coloured. Tip onto the minced meat, add the allspice, peppercorns and 3 tbsp brandy, then mix well. Leave to mingle for 1 hr, or longer if you like, in the fridge.

  3. Add the oil to the pan and quickly brown the loins; you don’t need to cook them through. If you fancy, add 1 tbsp brandy to the pan and flambé them to finish. Set aside on a plate and tip any pan juices into the minced mixture.

  4. Heat oven to 160C/140C fan/gas 3. Remove the garlic from the mince and season generously. It’s a good idea to fry a small ball of the mixture, let it cool, then taste to check the seasoning. Line a 900g loaf tin with a strip of foil. Stretch each piece of bacon a little with your knife. Arrange the rashers so that the base of the tin is covered with overlapping bacon and the rashers come neatly up the sides in a single layer and overhang generously. Boil a kettleful of water.

  5. Press a third of the mince into the tin. Make a lengthways channel along one side, then poke in a line of loin pieces, so that they meet end-to-end. Scatter half the cornichons over the other side. Add the next third of mince and repeat, this time with the loins and cornichons on the opposite sides. Cover with the remaining mince, then bring the bacon over to seal. Wrap tightly in foil and put in a deep roasting tin. Pour in enough hot water to come halfway up the terrine and bake for 2 hrs or until a skewer comes out hot from the middle of the terrine, and the juices run clear. Top up the water if needed.

  6. To press the terrine, sit the loaf tin on a rack in a roasting tin. Tear some cardboard to fit the top of the loaf tin as neatly as you can (we used egg box lids). Add a few layers and sit something extremely heavy on top to press the cardboard and terrine down (we used a cast-iron dish). Cool to room temperature, then chill completely, ideally overnight. Remove the weight and re-wrap the terrine in clean foil or cling film. Ideally, let it mature for 2 days in the fridge before eating. Serve with the pickle salad, below, and remaining cornichons.

Ads by Google

Comments, questions and tips

Sign in or create your My Good Food account to join the discussion.
Be the first to comment...We'd love to hear how you got on with this recipe. Did you like it? Would you recommend others give it a try?
Be the first to ask a question about this recipe...Unsure about the cooking time or want to swap an ingredient? Ask us your questions and we’ll try and help you as soon as possible. Or if you want to offer a solution to another user’s question, feel free to get involved...
Be the first to suggest a tip for this recipe...Got your own twist on this recipe? Or do you have suggestions for possible swaps and additions? We’d love to hear your ideas.