Walnut & coffee gateau

Walnut & coffee gateau

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(7 ratings)

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Cooking time

Prep: 1 hr Cook: 15 mins

Skill level

Moderately easy

Servings

Serves 8

MasterChef judge Gregg Wallace shares his recipe for a classic cake - it's much easier than it looks

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition info

Nutrition per serving

kcalories
971
protein
12g
carbs
80g
fat
69g
saturates
25g
fibre
2g
sugar
69g
salt
0.17g

Ingredients

For the sponge

  • butter, for greasing
  • 4 eggs
  • 175g caster sugar
  • 100g plain flour
  • 1 tbsp sunflower oil
  • 140g walnuts, very finely chopped

For the cream filling

  • 300ml double cream
  • 2 tbsp icing sugar
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract

For the butter icing

  • 140g unsalted butter, softened
  • 300g icing sugar
  • 1 tbsp milk
  • 1 tbsp coffee essence

To decorate

  • 100g finely chopped walnuts
  • 50g roughly chopped walnuts
  • 8 walnut halves

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Method

  1. Heat the oven to 190C/170C fan/ gas 5. Grease and line 3 x 20cm round sandwich tins. For the sponge use an electric whisk to beat the eggs and sugar in a large bowl until light and thick like semi-whipped cream. Gently fold in the flour, then the oil and finally the chopped nuts. Divide mix between the tins and bake for 15 mins or until cooked through. Turn cakes out onto a wire rack and leave to cool.
  2. To make the cream filling, whip the cream with the sugar and vanilla, then set aside. For the butter icing, beat the butter with half the sugar until smooth. Add remaining sugar, stir in the milk and coffee essence, then continue to beat until everything is combined.
  3. To assemble, spread a third of the cream filling on top of one of the cakes, put another cake on top, spread another third of the cream over and lay the final cake on top. Put remaining cream in a piping bag fitted with a star-shaped nozzle.
  4. Use a palette knife to spread the butter icing all over the top and sides of the cake. Lightly press the finely chopped walnuts into the sides and scatter the top with the roughly chopped walnuts. Pipe 8 swirls of cream on top, one for each slice, and top with a walnut half. The cake will now sit happily in a cool place for a couple of hours but is best enjoyed on the day it is made.

Recipe from Good Food magazine, November 2010

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Comments

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Vegirl's picture
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I made the sponge exactly as stated. I baked it in two tins and split the baked sponges in two. So i had an extra layer. I didn't find the sponge recipe at all too sweet and it rose as much as you would expect this type of sponge to rise. It is beautifully light and the contrasting texture of the walnuts is lovely. It is a tad on the bland side however.
I used only a sweetened coffee flavoured cream to fill and coat. Not a big butter icing fan and it seems far too heavy a thing for such a beautifully light sponge. I think it is also probably the butter icing that will make it too sweet for many. My finished cake was certainly not over sweet and very, very light.

jweg1210's picture
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I quite like this - yes it is sweet, but I think having cream in the middle instead of a double buttercream whammy helps to make it lighter. I made it in 2 tins rather than 3, and used SF flour. I only then made half the cream mixture, which was ample. Not saying I will make again, but it was an hour well spent.

suzyahart's picture
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I would just like to say I have made this a few times now and always comes out lovely. I was very surprised by the negative comments so please don't be put off give it a go, my children have even made it. I have planned to make a giant walnut whip cake with the recipe next month. I do agree the icing is a little sweet, but just start by adding half the sugar then add a little more until it suits ( i think i add 200g) Lets be fair we will know Mr W has a very sweet tooth :-)

jennylmd's picture

The recipe sounds ok, but I haven't made it yet. After reading the comments I am reluctant to make it. I wanted to have it for my wedding anniversary, but if it's too sweet, I shall not even try since my guests are not sweet lovers. What a pity, it seemed easy to prepare.

mufalda's picture
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My sponges were ok, but the cake is really really sweet and I didn't like it.

lmeyer's picture

I haven't made this but the cake recipe should work looking at the ingredients. It is a whisked sponge so the eggs work as the raising agent. The instructions aren't very clear but you need to whisk the eggs and sugar until they are huge and at the "ribbon" stage where if you drizzle some of the egg mixture over itself it will leave lines on top without disappearing. This is a lovely light type of sponge which usually is quite bland on its own but once combined with fillings is absolutely delicious!

michelle-macdougall's picture
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I made this too and I agree, it was very flat and extremely sweet,I didn't even bother with the frosting since I tasted the actual cake and was very disappointed.

coralieshort's picture
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This cake has no raising agent specified so never actually rises - a bit like a nutty pancake!!! not what i expected for my granny's birthday cake.

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