Rye bread

Rye bread

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(5 ratings)

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Cooking time

Takes 50 mins plus rising and proving

Skill level

Easy

Servings

Makes 1 loaf

This rye bread recipe is lower in gluten than your average white loaf - this recipe uses white or wholemeal flour to give a light texture but you can experiment with ratios

Nutrition and extra info

Additional info

  • Freezable
  • Healthy
Nutrition info

Nutrition per serving (8 slices)

kcalories
170
protein
5.6g
carbs
34.3g
fat
1.1g
saturates
0.2g
fibre
6.9g
sugar
2.3g
salt
0.3g

Ingredients

  • 200g rye flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 200g strong white or wholemeal flour
  • 7g sachet fast-action dried yeast
  • ½ tsp fine salt
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tsp caraway seed (optional)

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Method

  1. Tip the flours, yeast and salt into a bowl. In a jug, mix the honey with 250ml warm water, pour the liquid into the bowl and mix to form a dough. Rye flour can be quite dry and absorbs lots of water, if the dough looks too dry add more warm water until you have a soft dough Tip out onto your work surface and knead for 10 mins until smooth. Rye contains less gluten than white flour so the dough will not feel as springy as a conventional white loaf.
  2. Place the dough in a well oiled bowl, cover with cling film and leave to rise in a warm place for 1-2 hrs, or until roughly doubled in size. Dust a 2lb/900g loaf tin with flour.
  3. Tip the dough back onto your work surface and knead briefly to knock out any air bubbles. If using caraway seeds work these in to the dough. Shape into a smooth oval loaf and pop into your tin. Cover the tin with oiled cling film and leave to rise somewhere warm for a further 1 – 1.5 hr, or until doubled in size.
  4. Heat oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7. Remove the cling film and dust the surface of the loaf with rye flour. Slash a few incisions on an angle then bake for 30 mins until dark brown and hollow sounding when tapped. Transfer to a wire cooling rack and leave to cool for at least 20 mins before serving

Recipe from bbcgoodfood.com, February 2013

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Comments

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bob54's picture

Sorry to be so specific, but this is not a true rye bread for those trying to avoid wheat. This is a 50% rye and 50% wheat flour loaf. I know you need a gluten component to make the dough rise by trapping the CO2 while the bread proves but there are other sources of gluten as my baker was very quick to point out. Why not give a recipe for a real rye bread.

rockygal's picture

I followed the recipe religiously but the dough was so VERY sticky, it was virtually impossible to knead it. I had to keep on adding more and more and more flour so that I could work with the dough at all. I did manage to "save" the bread but it turned out very thick.

mashman100's picture

Yes the mixture is rather sticky. If you are doing this by hand you can add a little olive oil and use a sturdy wooden spoon to mix the dough. But be warned that this is will require some muscle to turn and fold the dough! i mix the dough in a large steel cooking pot with a pair of handles, giving me something to grip as i turn the pot towards me and keep the wooden spoon firm. This way I don't really need to touch the dough when it is really sticky, this keeps most of the goop off my hands! :)

NB. The crucial aspect of the rising stage in making any bread is not the length of time that you allow it to rise, BUT the size increase. Do not allow your bread to rise any more than double the size (less is fine) otherwise you will end up with an overly dense loaf. I find that if i place my bread somewhere warm it only takes about 30 minutes for the bread to rise to a suitable size.

Katy00's picture
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We love this recipe! It's one of the best I've had. My grandmother always used to make breads and I love the flavor of this one! Next time, I'll do it. Still searching for more easy bread recipes for my collection. I found some at http://www.everything-bread.com and french version @ Gourmandia.fr. Anyway, thanks for sharing, I'll bookmark this page.

jennycarlton's picture

Very delicious bread and easy to leave to prove the first time in the fridge overnight. Did the second prove and baked it after work today. Added more caraway than the recipe. Great flavour.

julesthenorweegie's picture

How many slices will it cut into for the nutrition stated?

helloha's picture

Stop writing your con jobs on this page!!!

spankie's picture
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Delicious and very easy to make. Will definitely make this again.

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