Swirly lemon drizzle fingers

Swirly lemon drizzle fingers

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(31 ratings)

Prep: 15 mins Cook: 40 mins

Easy

Makes 18 fingers
Polenta (sometimes called fine cornmeal) gives this cake its yellow colour and soft texture

Nutrition and extra info

  • Freezable

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal214
  • fat11g
  • saturates6g
  • carbs27g
  • sugars17g
  • fibre0g
  • protein3g
  • salt0.3g
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Ingredients

  • 200g butter, well softened, plus extra
    Butter

    Butter

    butt-err

    Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

  • 200g golden caster sugar
  • 4 large eggs
    Eggs

    Egg

    egg

    The ultimate convenience food, eggs are powerhouses of nutrition, packed with protein and a…

  • 100g fine polenta or fine cornmeal
    Polenta

    Polenta

    poh-len-tah

    An Italian storecupboard staple, polenta has its roots in the peasant cuisine of northern Italy…

  • 140g self-raising flour
  • zest 3 lemons
    Lemon

    Lemon

    le-mon

    Oval in shape, with a pronouced bulge on one end, lemons are one of the most versatile fruits…

For the swirl and drizzle

  • 4 tbsp lemon curd
  • 5 tbsp golden or white caster sugar
  • zest and juice 1 lemon
    Lemon

    Lemon

    le-mon

    Oval in shape, with a pronouced bulge on one end, lemons are one of the most versatile fruits…

Method

  1. Heat oven to 180C/fan 160C/gas 4 and make sure there’s a shelf ready in the middle of the oven. Butter a rectangular baking tray or small roasting tin, about 20cm x 30cm. Cut out a sheet of baking paper a bit larger than the tin, then push it in and smooth it out with your hands so it sticks to the butter. Snip into the corners with a pair of scissors to get the paper to lie neatly.

  2. Put all the cake ingredients and a pinch of salt into a large bowl, then use electric beaters to beat until creamy and smooth. Scoop into the tin, then level the top. Spoon the lemon curd over the batter in thick stripes. Use the handle of the spoon to swirl the curd into the cake – not too much or you won’t see the swirls once it’s cooked. Bake for about 35 mins or until golden and risen. It should have shrunk away from the sides of the tin ever so slightly and feel springy. Don’t open the oven before 30 mins cooking is up.

  3. Leave the cake in the tin for 10 mins or until just cool enough to handle. Carefully lift out of the tin and put it onto a cooling rack, sat over a tray or something similar to catch drips of drizzle. To make the drizzle, mix 4 tbsp sugar and the lemon juice together and spoon over the cake. Toss the lemon zest with the final 1 tbsp sugar and scatter over the top. Let the cake cool completely, then lift onto a board, peel away the sides of the baking paper and cut the cake into fingers. Will keep in an airtight tin for 3 days.

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Comments, questions and tips

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Laughtos17
28th Sep, 2016
5.05
Made this today for my husband to take into work, I couldn't find polenta in my supermarket so just used self raising flour but the outcome is amazingly tasty a big hit with everyone and it was unbelievably easy to make.
cookiedew
2nd Jun, 2014
5.05
Having baked all sorts of cakes for family and colleagues for years, it turns out to my surprise that these are the absolute favourite at home and at work. So, I make them very regularly. I have 2 tips in particular. Firstly on lemon curd sinking and 'swirling'. Yes it does work if you use small blobs (half a teaspoon amount) and swirl with a skewer, quite deep into the mixture. By that I mean insert the skewer a good 1cm or so and swirl away. My blobs end up merging into each other a bit, but I never have the lemon curd sinking to the bottom of the cake. It sounds time consuming but it really isn't. One Sunday morning I managed to assemble this cake and get it in the oven in the time it took our breakfast eggs to boil. Ok, I was organised ahead of time with everything out on the counter, but it was pretty quick nonetheless. My second tip, if you make this regularly, do not to use polenta from a supermarket. You can buy it in Asian shops for about a fifth of the price or lower. Happy swirling! :o)
amytuckwell
9th May, 2014
3.8
I made these last week and they were so yummy. Went down very well at home and in the office! However, like some other people, I found the lemon curd sunk to the bottom and created a sticky layer underneath. Next time I might leave this out as I'm sure they would be just as delicious.
alijhampton
29th Nov, 2013
I am a missionary working in a very limited kitchen. I made these and they worked.I had to change the measures to cups. My oven has no temperature control so it was all guess work but they worked and are coming to the party this afternoon. I don't thing they will be coming back!
alijhampton
29th Nov, 2013
I am a missionary working in a very limited kitchen. I made these and they worked.I had to change the measures to cups. My oven has no temperature control so it was all guess work but they worked and are coming to the party this afternoon. I don't thing they will be coming back!
clarkesa
22nd Oct, 2013
I made these little lemon fingers last Saturday 19/10/13. Yum yum yum, they are delightful little lemony cakes with squiggy lemon curd pockets in the sponge. After reading other comments I added the lemon curd in little blobs and gently swirled them with the tip of a teaspoon. I used lemon juice and icing sugar for the icing. I used self raising flour because couldn't find Polenta. They will definately be a family favourite. I thought 180c was a little high, my cooker is very efficient, so I will lower the oven to 170c next time.
langl01
17th Jul, 2013
I have made these several times now and they have never dissappointed the receivers, very moist and vey lemony and extremely morish :-)
zetecm4plm
16th Sep, 2012
5.05
A really moist cake with a lovely crunchy topping. The lemon curd swirling didn't really work though, but I think that is because I used Stork baking liquid instead of butter. And although it makes a lovely moist cake, the mixture is very runny and the lemon curd sank to the bottom. For a hot pudding it would be lovely, with a lemony sauce under the sponge. But not so good for cooling down and cutting into slices. I will make again but use butter instead.
gailjones
15th Jul, 2012
5.05
I have made this cake so many times and it has turned out fantastic every time. I make cakes to take to work and this cake is the one that I am asked to make the most. A gorgeous lemony cake.
missus0_0
18th May, 2012
5.05
Lovely cake! I followed the recipe apart from sprinkling with lemon zest at the end. I used home made lemon curd which is probably softer than commercial lemon curd. The result is superb - a lovely, light sponge with an interesting and appetising swirly pattern on top. I'll definitely be making this again.

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wendy56
27th Dec, 2014
These are delicious! I used olive margarine, granulated sugar and only 3 eggs and it worked beautifully. Also added 1tsp baking powder.Whizzed it all up in a food processor and I stirred the lemon curd (whilst still in the jar) to make it flow smoothly and had no problems. Froze and defrosted well. Will be making again.
cookiedew
2nd Jun, 2014
5.05
Having baked all sorts of cakes for family and colleagues for years, it turns out to my surprise that these are the absolute favourite at home and at work. So, I make them very regularly. I have 2 tips in particular. Firstly on lemon curd sinking and 'swirling'. Yes it does work if you use small blobs (half a teaspoon amount) and swirl with a skewer, quite deep into the mixture. By that I mean insert the skewer a good 1cm or so and swirl away. My blobs end up merging into each other a bit, but it never have the lemon curd sinking to the bottom of the cake. It sounds time consuming but it really isn't. One Sunday morning I managed to assemble this cake and get it in the oven in the time it took our breakfast eggs to boil. Ok, I was organised ahead of time with everything out on the counter, but it was pretty quick nonetheless. My second tip, if you make this regularly, is not to use polenta from a supermarket. You can buy it in Asian shops for about a fifth of the price or lower. Happy swirling! :o)