Chocolate orange marble cake

Chocolate orange marble cake

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(23 ratings)

Prep: 15 mins Cook: 55 mins

Easy

Cuts into 10 slices
For a deliciously nostalgic cake, combine a classic flavour combination of orange and chocolate in this retro two-tone bake

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal397
  • fat23.1g
  • saturates13.7g
  • carbs41.5g
  • sugars26.1g
  • fibre1.6g
  • protein5.6g
  • salt0.7g
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Ingredients

  • 225g very soft butter, plus extra for greasing
    Butter

    Butter

    butt-err

    Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

  • 225g caster sugar
  • 225g self-raising flour
  • 4 large eggs, beaten
  • 2 tbsp milk

    Milk

    mill-k

    One of the most widely used ingredients, milk is often referred to as a complete food. While cow…

  • 3 tbsp cocoa powder, sifted
  • 1 large orange, zest and 1 tbsp orange juice
    Orange

    Orange

    or-ange

    One of the best-known citrus fruits, oranges aren't necessarily orange - some varieties are…

  • a few drops orange food colouring (optional)
  • 50g orange chocolate (we used Green & Black's Maya Gold), broken into pieces
    Chocolate

    Chocolate

    chok-let

    Chocolate as we know it in pressed

Method

  1. Heat oven to 180C/fan 160C/gas 4. Grease and line the base of a loaf tin (8 x 21cm/ 2lb) with baking parchment. Beat the butter, sugar, eggs and flour together in a large bowl with an electric whisk or in a food processor until lump free.

  2. Split the mixture into two bowls, beat the milk, followed by the cocoa powder into one. Beat the orange juice, zest and orange food colouring, if using, into the other.

  3. Spoon alternate dollops of the mixture into the cake tin, then use a skewer to create a marble pattern by dragging it through the mixture in swirls. Make sure you don’t overmix or you won’t see the pattern. Smooth the surface if necessary.

  4. Bake the cake for 45 - 55 mins until golden and risen, and a skewer poked in comes out clean.

  5. Leave the cake in the tin to cool, then turn out. Melt the chocolate in a bowl over barely simmering water or gently in the microwave. Use a spoon to drizzle the chocolate over the cake.

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Comments, questions and tips

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kakemadz
15th Jan, 2014
I've found that sometimes, the "self-raising" bit of the flour differs either between brands or even with different packets of the same brand of flour. The quantity and potency of the raising agent isn't always identical. Add to that the quantity, potency and size of each ingredient (e.g. a large egg from a pack I buy will be different to the large eggs you buy in a different place) so every once in a while, you'll get crazy results with the same recipe. So your idea to reduce by a quarter is a good one.
fortlandgirl
12th Dec, 2013
Made this 4or5 times now,great recipe ,just keep an eye on it after 45 mins in oven,very popular in this house !
rachel_r
11th Nov, 2013
This was lovely, I had no problems with the cake setting - I checked it after 45 minutes at 160°C (fan oven) and it wasn't quite done, so left it for another few minutes until a cocktail stick came out clean. I made it when some friends came for dinner and it went down very well! The only thing I would say is that the orange part of the cake could be a bit more orangey, but the melted orange chocolate on the top makes up for it.
stigyo
20th Sep, 2013
set perfectly looks exact
foodgeek
20th Jul, 2013
Right, if it doesn't work this time then I give up!!! For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html.
foodgeek
20th Jul, 2013
No idea why but my last comment seems to have disappeared so here goes again. For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here "h**p://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html"
foodgeek
20th Jul, 2013
No idea why but my last comment seems to have disappeared so here goes again. For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html.
foodgeek
20th Jul, 2013
No idea why but my last comment seems to have disappeared so here goes again. For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html.
foodgeek
20th Jul, 2013
No idea why but my last comment seems to have disappeared so here goes again. For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html.
foodgeek
20th Jul, 2013
For all the people having some trouble with this cake 'not cooking' it is most likely to do with the type or brand of cocoa powder you are using. Might sound silly but most popular brands of cocoa powder use a process called the 'Dutch process' to to manufacture the cocoa powder and this changes it's chemical properties by making PH neutral. This counteracts the setting properties of the eggs (which require acidity to set) and is why your cakes are not setting but are staying runny in the middle - if you swap out a little flour for baking powder it will help to remedy the problem as baking powder adds back in the acidity the eggs need to set. Say maybe change out 25g of flour for one table spoon of baking powder. If anyone wants to read more technical details have a read at this link http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html. Hope this helps some of you solve your problems with this cake.

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