Best Yorkshire puddings

Prep: 5 mins Cook: 20 mins


Makes 8 large puds or 24 small

The secret to getting gloriously puffed-up Yorkshires is to have the fat sizzling hot and don't open the oven door!

Nutrition and extra info

  • Freezable
  • Vegetarian

Nutrition: per pud (8 large puds)

  • kcal199
  • fat13g
  • saturates2g
  • carbs15g
  • sugars1g
  • fibre0g
  • protein6g
  • salt0.12g
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  • 140g plain flour (this is about 200ml/7fl oz)
  • 4 egg (200ml/7fl oz)



    The ultimate convenience food, eggs are powerhouses of nutrition, packed with protein and a…

  • 200ml milk



    One of the most widely used ingredients, milk is often referred to as a complete food. While cow…

  • sunflower oil, for cooking
    Sunflower oil

    Sunflower oil

    A variety of oils can be used for baking. Sunflower is the one we use most often at Good Food as…


  1. Heat oven to 230C/fan 210C/gas 8. Drizzle a little sunflower oil evenly into 2 x 4-hole Yorkshire pudding tins or a 12-hole non-stick muffin tin and place in the oven to heat through.

  2. To make the batter, tip 140g plain flour into a bowl and beat in four eggs until smooth. Gradually add 200ml milk and carry on beating until the mix is completely lump-free. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the batter into a jug, then remove the hot tins from the oven. Carefully and evenly pour the batter into the holes. Place the tins back in the oven and leave undisturbed for 20-25 mins until the puddings have puffed up and browned. Serve immediately. You can now cool them and freeze for up to 1 month.

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Comments, questions and tips

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Comments (352)

Hanuhr's picture

Tried this recipe with soya milk. The result looked like a proper yorkshire pudding but it wasn't crispy at all. I might reduce the number of eggs for future attempts.

IdahoMum's picture

Being a transplant to the UK, I've always had an excuse for my hit and miss Yorkies. It's been a source of embarrassment though as I love to bake and pride myself on making a great meal. I tried these tonight in my large Yorkshire pudding tins, which is the tin most of my failures happened in, and they were incredible. Huge and soft with the perfect crisp on the outside. I've pinned this one. It's a definite keeper-wish I could post the photo. They were even bigger than the ones in the recipe photo.

malcolmlewis's picture

My wife has been making Yorkshire puddings for 40 years, over time for some reason they have been getting flatter and flatter, so I challenged her and said I would have a go. Saw this recipe and....................they came out superb. Fantastic recipe, fluffy and light. I have now got the job of making the yorkies.

Emmamay84's picture

Woohoo!! I've always made my own Yorkshire puddings, sometimes they were fab, sometimes rubbish, refusing to give in and go for the frozen ones when my own were disastrous. Today I decided enough was enough. No more hit and miss for me, I needed a reliable recipe. This one was perfect! I halved the ingredients making just 4 large Yorkshire's. They were golden, fluffy and delicious! I cooked them before I cooked everything else so I didn't have to open the oven, then I popped them back in for a few minutes to warm them whilst I was serving up. I'm a Yorkshire girl and will no longer feel ashamed about not being able to make Yorkshire puddings!

chessop's picture

This recipe makes a reliable batter pudding but it is not a Yorkshire pudding, at least not the kind you want filled with gravy next to your roast beef. This is because it could never be crisp with that much egg and milk in it. If you actually want a recipe for a traditional Yorkshire pudding that deserves its place next to the beef on your plate, read Felicity Cloake's article on this venerable classic in the Guardian, it's on the net.

IdahoMum's picture

Have you even tried the recipe? It was the perfect crisp and tasted amazing filled with gravy by my roast.

lbeatt's picture

OMG! This recipe works a treat. I halved recipe. I even used the Yorkshire pudding tin that had been lying in cupboard for ages, as usually use frozen ones! They came out massive! Family very impressed. Tin will defo be used a lot more now. So easy to make, and in no time at all. Yorkies for every Sunday dinner from now on LOL! No more frozen ones for me.

karenJW2013's picture

tried this recipe on sunday and for the first time in my life, my attempt at making my own yorkshire puds actually resulted in light fluffy successful yorkshire pud instead of some stodgy heavy unrisen mess. they were so light and rose so much they actually slid out of the tin and onto the next shelf (a very new unused nonstick yorkshire pudding tin lol). i'm ashamed to admit my previous failure being from yorkshire but thanks to this recipe i can now stop using the frozen or precooked shop bought ones. a proud moment! lol :D this is definitely a keeper.

walo's picture

Great recipe: easy to make; and yorkshires came out really well risen.

Jessy2393's picture

Great recipe - I didn't want that many yorkshires so just split the recipes in half. They rose perfectly.

Bellydance 68's picture

Made these using gluten free plain flour and they were absolutely amazing. Best Yorkshires I have ever made.

MoscowMama's picture

Works every time. Brilliant!

genputtay's picture

Quite right that this Yorkshire Pudding recipe should claim to be the best. It is. Finally after years of culinary Yorkshire disasters, I can finally hold my head up high. As mentioned by others, I too chilled the batter. Apparently it makes the Yorkies lighter, but with only one successful batch under my belt, I have nothing to compare it to. Watch this space for updates. I also used my silicone muffin tray despite having read many online discussions calling shenanigan at the idea of silicone. Instead, I crossed my fingers for twenty five minutes and watched the oven door. The result = perfect. Just like the picture!

lynnthompson's picture

The recipe states that these can be cooked and then frozen for up to a month but it doesn't state how to cook these once they have been frozen - any ideas anyone ???

AngieW123's picture

The frozen ones you buy in supermarkets take approx 3 mins in a hot oven. That's for the small ones - not sure about the bigger sizes.

magicbullet's picture

I tried this recipe, but I must have got something badly wrong. My wife had said this was my last chance to get a meal right for my in-laws, so there was a bit more pressure on me. The whole dinner was a disaster, so later in the day my wife locked me out of the house, and I had no alternative but to sleep in the shed. It wasn't that bad, but I have a phobia of spiders (and there are some big ones in that shed) so I kept imagining they were creeping over me in the night. Sleeping in the freezing shed didn't do my cold and cough any good, but I don't blame my wife as she puts up with some terrible meals from me. I'll try again with the Yorkshires, but maybe just for myself! BTW my wife did let me back in the house the next morning, so all's well that end's well.'s picture

Wow, you do have a hard life, being locked out of your house due to your cooking not being good seems very harsh!
Hope all is well now in your home.! … Maybe ask your wife to cook, and if it's no good, you can lock her out with the spiders.!!

Jojo2016's picture

I've just made this recipe hope it turns out good my other attempts at Yorkshire pudding turn out like heavy small cakes

janex's picture

This recipe works every time.

Barneys baking's picture

Being a Yorkshire girl, I've been making Yorkshire puddings all my life, first with my mum as a child and now for my own family.. If you follow this recipe exactly you can't go wrong.
The trick really is to have your oven HOT. I cook mine for 15 mins on highest heat then turn the oven down to 180 (fan) for the last 5 mins to ensure they are cooked at the bottom as well as the top. Lovely fluffy yorkshires every time.


Questions (10)

amina248's picture

How much batter do you pour in to the tin and can I use a cupcake tin because I don't have a muffin or yorkshire pudding tin?!
Thank you!

goodfoodteam's picture

Hi there, yes you could use your cupcake tin. Pour the equivalent of a couple of tablespoons into the tin and cook as above.

Charldene1's picture

has anyone tried these with soya milk? TIA

jrbdaughter's picture

Can someone please convert these measurements for me. I am from the United States and at the moment, I cannot locate my conversion chart. Also, I have a gas oven and need that temperature converted. Many thanks!!

tammyt's picture

Hi! Does anyone know what gas mark the oven should be on to preheat then cook these and where in the oven they go? Top, middle or bottom shelf? Thanks!

goodfoodteam's picture

The oven needs to be preheated to gas 8 and they go in at the top of the oven. Hope that helps.


Wendyflett's picture

Made these last week and the best I've made. Just have one question, can they be cooked from frozen or do I need to defrost first?

goodfoodteam's picture

Hi Wendyflett, thanks for your question and so glad you enjoyed them. Yes these can be cooked from frozen just pop into a medium oven for 25 mins or until heated through and crisp. 

Tkachiki's picture

Sounds interesting, but can someone give me the American oven temp, measurements for flour and milk, please? Thanks!

whofan99's picture

The oven temp is 400 degrees F, and I used 1 cup of flour, and a little less than a cup of milk. If you have pyrex glass measuring cups, those have the ml on them. They're also the best for measuring liquids, so I would recommend investing in a set if you're into baking. The batter ends up being slightly thicker than a crepe batter, but thinner than that of a pancake. Sorry that this is so late!

Tips (2)

Shaunie1975's picture

It's better to use equal quantities of ingredients.
What I do (for family of 5/6 2adults rest kids) crack two eggs into a bowl and weigh them. Then I add equal amounts of plain flour (sieved) and milk. A pinch of salt and pepper.
Give it a good mix with an electric mixer. Then I sieve the mixture again into another beaker with spout. I then leave in fridge for a couple
Of hours to allow it all to combine. Heat over on max with muffin tins and about a tea spoon of oil in each hole. Allow that to get really hot at least 30 mins. Remove mixture from fridge give another quick mix and then pour straight into muffin tin and in to oven. Reduce heat to gas 5 or 6 and leave in there for about 30 mins

Misplaced_One's picture

Oh, THANK YOU!!! Like eating crunchy air - not too good if you want to prevent yourself from over indulgence though, I ate the lot - thank goodness I only made half a batch.

One tip, don't overfill the muffin trays - about 1/2" or 1.5cm is plenty full enough, they will grow and grow in the oven - My nieces love to watch them