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Chocolate orange marble cake

Chocolate orange marble cake

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(21 ratings)

Prep: 15 mins Cook: 55 mins

Easy

Cuts into 10 slices
For a deliciously nostalgic cake, combine a classic flavour combination of orange and chocolate in this retro two-tone bake

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal397
  • fat23.1g
  • saturates13.7g
  • carbs41.5g
  • sugars26.1g
  • fibre1.6g
  • protein5.6g
  • salt0.7g
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Ingredients

  • 225g very soft butter, plus extra for greasing

    Butter

    butt-err

    Butter is made when lactic-acid producing bacteria are added to cream and churned to make an…

  • 225g caster sugar
  • 225g self-raising flour
  • 4 large egg, beaten
  • 2 tbsp milk

    Milk

    mill-k

    One of the most widely used ingredients, milk is often referred to as a complete food. While cow…

  • 3 tbsp cocoa powder, sifted
  • 1 large orange, zest and 1 tbsp orange juice

    Orange

    or-ange

    One of the best-known citrus fruits, oranges aren't necessarily orange - some varieties are…

  • a few drops orange food colouring (optional)
  • 50g orange chocolate (we used Green & Black's Maya Gold), broken into pieces

Method

  1. Heat oven to 180C/fan 160C/gas 4. Grease and line the base of a loaf tin (8 x 21cm/ 2lb) with baking parchment. Beat the butter, sugar, eggs and flour together in a large bowl with an electric whisk or in a food processor until lump free.

  2. Split the mixture into two bowls, beat the milk, followed by the cocoa powder into one. Beat the orange juice, zest and orange food colouring, if using, into the other.

  3. Spoon alternate dollops of the mixture into the cake tin, then use a skewer to create a marble pattern by dragging it through the mixture in swirls. Make sure you don’t overmix or you won’t see the pattern. Smooth the surface if necessary.

  4. Bake the cake for 45 - 55 mins until golden and risen, and a skewer poked in comes out clean.

  5. Leave the cake in the tin to cool, then turn out. Melt the chocolate in a bowl over barely simmering water or gently in the microwave. Use a spoon to drizzle the chocolate over the cake.

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Comments (35)

philstaz's picture
5

Very nice and moist. Cooked it a little longer as the comments suggested. I also added a little bit of orange essence. Very tasty!

Jules1909's picture
5

Very nice. Sometimes marble cakes can be very dry, but this one isn't!!! :)

hcupcake19's picture

Made this for the first time yesterday and it was brilliant! The only thing I had to change was the cooking time as it took an extra 20ish minutes in my fan oven at 160 degrees. Like a few other people mentioned, the top started to get a bit too brown so foil over the top worked perfectly.

katies286's picture
3.75

I made this cake this evening and it turned out lovely. Like other people my cake needed a little longer in the oven - another 20 mins or so at 160 fan. My orange sponge was also a little wetter than the chocolate sponge due to the added juice from the orange, so I added a little more flour. It's brilliant sponge and really tasty! Will definitely bake again.

coveredinflour's picture

Like so many people, I found that this cake needed a bit more time in the oven. Another 15-20 mins. I reduced the heat to 150 at 45 mins and covered it in foil when I noticed it getting too brown on top.

This seems to have worked really well. I have made it 4 or 5 times now (admittedly without the chocolate topping) and it is delicious. I recommend serving it warm with some Greek yoghurt!

lucyploop's picture

I loved this recipe.

I did adapt it slightly as I wanted to make a cake. I divided the mixture into two cake tins and baked for 20 minutes at 160fan and it came out perfect. A tip would be when dividing the mixture into two before adding the cocoa, put more mixture into the bowl which is to have no cocoa. This is because when you add cocoa, milk and orange juice into the other bowl, you increase the amount of mixture in that bowl and so you don't really have half and half of each mixture, and the resultant cake is predominantly chocolate. When dolloping into the tins and spreading around, make sure the mixture goes all the way to the edge of the tin.

I also made a chocolate orange buttercream for my cake for between the two layers. The ingredients where 100g softened butter, 300g icing sugar, 40g cocoa, and 40ml orange juice (add the orange juice bit at a time and check the taste is to your liking as you go along). Whisk the ingredients together and spread on when the cake is completely cool (I chill them in the fridge beforehand). I didn't add any chocolate to the top as the buttercream was enough and didn't want to hide the marble effect!

The cake is scrumptious and lovely and moist! Makes an interesting change from my usual Victoria sponges!

SaCu's picture

Great suggestions, thanks.

aislingduffy's picture

I love this! I reduced the dry ingredients by 1/4 but kept the eggs at 4 because reducing it left the cake very crumbly. Also I added melted milk chocolate to the "chocolate half" of the mixture. Was yummy. Also used Terry's chocolate orange for the top.

coasterstep's picture

I had a different problem to all the other posts! My cake "boiled over" and made a real mess in the oven! I used a loaf tin with the correct measurements and ingredients were carefully weighed/measured. The (remaining) cake needed an hour to cook. Have not tasted it yet, but if I made it again I would reduce the ingredients by a quarter.

kakemadz's picture

I've found that sometimes, the "self-raising" bit of the flour differs either between brands or even with different packets of the same brand of flour. The quantity and potency of the raising agent isn't always identical. Add to that the quantity, potency and size of each ingredient (e.g. a large egg from a pack I buy will be different to the large eggs you buy in a different place) so every once in a while, you'll get crazy results with the same recipe. So your idea to reduce by a quarter is a good one.

fortlandgirl's picture

Made this 4or5 times now,great recipe ,just keep an eye on it after 45 mins in oven,very popular in this house !

rachel_r's picture

This was lovely, I had no problems with the cake setting - I checked it after 45 minutes at 160°C (fan oven) and it wasn't quite done, so left it for another few minutes until a cocktail stick came out clean. I made it when some friends came for dinner and it went down very well! The only thing I would say is that the orange part of the cake could be a bit more orangey, but the melted orange chocolate on the top makes up for it.

stigyo's picture

set perfectly looks exact

foodgeek's picture

Right, if it doesn't work this time then I give up!!! For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html.

foodgeek's picture

No idea why but my last comment seems to have disappeared so here goes again. For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here "h**p://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html"

foodgeek's picture

No idea why but my last comment seems to have disappeared so here goes again. For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html.

foodgeek's picture

No idea why but my last comment seems to have disappeared so here goes again. For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html.

foodgeek's picture

No idea why but my last comment seems to have disappeared so here goes again. For all the people having trouble with this cake setting, it might have something to do with the cocoa powder you're using. Most cocoa powder sold in the UK is made using the 'Dutch' process and leaves the cocoa powder slightly alkaline or PH neutral and this will affect the acidity of the batter. Eggs need acidity to set in the baking process so this may be why your cakes are not setting. Try replacing some flour with baking powder and this will 'bump' up the acidity meaning the eggs might set better - maybe replace 25g of flour with a tablespoon of baking powder? For anyone that wants more technical details you can have a read here http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html.

foodgeek's picture

For all the people having some trouble with this cake 'not cooking' it is most likely to do with the type or brand of cocoa powder you are using. Might sound silly but most popular brands of cocoa powder use a process called the 'Dutch process' to to manufacture the cocoa powder and this changes it's chemical properties by making PH neutral. This counteracts the setting properties of the eggs (which require acidity to set) and is why your cakes are not setting but are staying runny in the middle - if you swap out a little flour for baking powder it will help to remedy the problem as baking powder adds back in the acidity the eggs need to set. Say maybe change out 25g of flour for one table spoon of baking powder. If anyone wants to read more technical details have a read at this link http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/cocoa.html. Hope this helps some of you solve your problems with this cake.

Tamara216's picture

I tried this recipe and the result was fantastic! A very soft, moist sponge with a nice orange flavour.

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Questions (7)

Nainaicoolai's picture

I made this cake for colleagues and it went down a treat. I'd like to make it again as a gift but can I freeze it??? Help?

goodfoodteam's picture

Hi Nainaicoolai thanks for your question. This cake should be fine to freeze once baked, but without the chocolate topping (you can add this once defrosted). However, we haven't tested freezing it in our kitchen so cannot guarantee perfect results. 

capreeruth's picture

hello! l want to bake this for amfriends wedding so am curious to know how long it lasts with and without refrigeration?

goodfoodteam's picture

Hi there. The cake will keep in an airtight contianer for up to 3 days.

lozze2's picture

Hi, I tried making this cake last night, but split the batter across two 20cm sandwich tins. In the oven it seemed to be rising well but shortly before taking out the cakes went flat, so I got two very thin cakes! Does anyone know why they fell flat? Did the orange juice affect the chemistry of the cakes?

goodfoodteam's picture

Hi there, thanks for getting in touch and sorry that the cakes didn't work out this time. It does sound like your oven may not be at the correct temperature - try testing the temperature with an oven thermometer. Let us know how you get on. Thanks, BBC Good Food web team

kakemadz's picture

I use orange, lemon, apple and other juices all the time so if your orange juice was fresh it shouldn't have had such an effect unless you put too much. The same used to happen to me and it was one of two things: either a problem mixing the ingredients, meaning they weren't mixed thoroughly, or the temperature in the oven wasn't constant throughout baking. The only other thing that used to affect my cakes was if the oven wasn't pre-heated well enough. I rarely get failures nowadays.
If none of these apply in your situation, then I'm also very curious if anyone else has an idea or suggestion of what could have gone wrong.

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