Raymond Blanc's cassoulet

Raymond Blanc's cassoulet

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(5 ratings)

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Cooking time

Takes about 5 hours, inc time in the oven

Skill level

Moderately easy

Servings

Serves 4 - 6

Raymond Blanc's rustic cassoulet is rich and warming – slow cooking at its best

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition info

Nutrition

kcalories
-
protein
-
carbs
-
fat
-
saturates
-
fibre
-
sugar
-
salt
-

Ingredients

  • 140g pork rind
  • 140g smoked streaky bacon
  • 300g garlic sausages
  • 600g dried haricot beans, soaked overnight in 3 times their volume of water
  • 1 celery stick
  • 1 small onion, preferably a white skinned mild one
  • 1 large carrot
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • 2 ripe plum tomatoes
  • 25g goose fat or 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 bouquet garni
  • 8 pinches of sea salt
  • 2 pinches of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 clove, lightly crushed
  • 2 tsp lemon juice

To finish

  • 4 confit ducks legs
  • 60g goose fat or 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 40g dried breadcrumbs
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped
  • a handful of fresh flatleaf parsley, coarsely chopped

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Method

  1. To cut the meats, roll up the pork rind like a Swiss roll. With the seam underneath, use a very sharp knife to cut the roll across into thin slices, then chop the rolled-up slices across into dice. Chop the bacon into small cubes (lardons). Cut the garlic sausage into 1cm thick slices.
  2. Drain the soaked beans and discard the soaking water. Tip the beans into a large saucepan, add the diced pork rind and lardons and cover with fresh cold water. Bring to the boil and blanch for 15-20 minutes. Drain the beans, rind and lardons into a colander, and discard the cooking water.
  3. Roughly chop the celery, onion and carrot. Peel the garlic cloves but leave them whole. Cut each tomato into eight wedges. (You never see tomatoes in a traditional cassoulet, but chef Raymond Blanc likes them for their colour and sweetness, so he puts a couple in.) Preheat the oven to 120C/fan 100C. (If cooking in a gas oven, use mark 2.)
  4. Heat the goose fat or olive oil in a 26cm flameproof casserole or deep overproof sauté pan over a low heat and sweat the celery, onion, carrot and garlic for 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and bouquet garni and cook slowly to get a sugary caramelisation (about 5 minutes). Add the sausage, beans, pork rind and lardons and pour in 1.2 litres/2 pints water. Bring to the boil, skim off the scum, then add the salt, pepper, clove and lemon juice.
  5. Transfer the casserole to the oven and cook, uncovered, for 2 hours, stirring every hour. At the end of this time, the beans will be soft and creamy in texture and the juices should have thickened. You may need to cook it for longer than 2 hours (say up to 2½ hours) to get to this stage – it depends
  6. Remove the cassoulet from the oven. Bury the duck legs in the beans and sprinkle over the goose fat or olive oil, breadcrumbs and garlic. Return to the oven and cook for a further 2 hours. Serve the cassoulet in bowls, sprinkled with chopped parsley.

Recipe from Good Food magazine, January 2003

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Comments

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steveartess's picture

I followed this recipe to the letter, and ended up with a greasy, inedible mess, but then I was clearly over optimistic to think that you could get a wholesome meal out of 600 grams of dried haricot beans and a small mountain of pork fat. What was Monsieur Blanc thinking of? But at least I have finally unwrapped the mystique of cassoulet... and my advice is avoid it! Mine ended up in the toilet.

hollywoozle's picture
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I love this recipe! Well worth the effort and time, delicious.

laurapope77's picture

I didn't have pork rind, so substituted with lardons (ie 280g lardons in total), which worked fine - and I left out the celery, adding one more small onion instead. I cooked it for about 5 hours in total and it was absolutely delicious - as I was making it to accompany roast leg of lamb, I left out the confit duck legs and it worked brilliantly. Really excellent recipe that I will definitely use again!

rojosa's picture
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Have made this on multiple occasions, even having to substitute ingredients if I couldn't obtain the exact ones and it is the very best cassoulet recipe we have ever tried. We love the cassoulet we had in France and wanted to find a recipe that was as close to what we tasted there as possible. This recipe does it and is fairly simple to make, considering the longish list of ingredients. Making it again this weekend and we can't wait !!!!!!!!!

maltoz's picture

Dont forget the addition of breadcrumbs to the dish will dry up the liquid, in the cassoulet. I believe purists, insist that eight coatings of browned bread crumbs, be stirred into the cassoulet. I find that three coatings is enough. I use Polish, garlic sausage, in the cassoulet, avaliable from all Polish, grocery stores, its a wonderful sausage, full of meat and flavour. Tomatoes, I find are essential to cassoulet, because they cut through the richness of this wonderful dish.

zetallgerman's picture

Not surprising that there is no nutritional info for this recipe! That would probably be because of the 3 secrets of French cooking: Butter, butter and butter ;-)

brettchallenger's picture

What on earth is a pinch of salt? Mr Blanc directs that "8" pinches of salt are added but wouldn't it be easier to say half a teaspoon, or some other specific measure.

littleal43's picture

Sounds like a heart attack on a plate!!

amphalon's picture
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Successful cassoulet recipe, the one I base most of my versions on. Like Fred I used duck legs which I browned before putting them in the mixture early on in the process.

I always cook it in the slow cooker. Low for about 8 hours gives you one of the best meals ever!

greypartridge's picture
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Cassoulet is perfect cold weather food. I used confit of goose legs (cut off because our Xmas goose wouldn't fit in the oven), lardons of home cured bacon and home made sausages. It's supposed to be served with salad but I stir fried green cabbage.

fredoliver's picture
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This is a great cassoulet. I used duck legs which I lightly fried first as I couldn't find duck confit and didn't have time to make it.

Rick Stein's version seems to lack vegetables

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